Kultaranta (Golden beach) is the summer residence of the President of Finland. The granite manor house was built by Alfred Kordelin in 1913-16. Kordelin was an industrialist, businessman and one of the richest Finnish entrepreneurs of his time. He was kidnapped by a group of Red Guards and murdered by a Russian sailor on 7 November 1917. Kordelin was childless and the manor's ownership shifted to the University of Turku. In 1922, the Finnish Parliament voted to acquire it for use as the president's summer residence.

Kultaranta was designed by the famous architect Lars Sonck. It’s surrounded by 560,000 square metres of park, belonging to the property. The parks around the manor, containing approximately a thousand square metres of greenhouse and a garden with 3500 roses called Medaljonki ('medallion'), are open to the public. Tours in the garden are organised by the City of Naantali's tourist service.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1913-1916
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

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User Reviews

JF GARDAIRE (12 months ago)
Bon, nous n'avons pas pu prendre le café avec le président mais la visite était très intéressante et nos guides bilingues, voire trilingues étaient très agréables et disponibles
Aino Turunen (12 months ago)
Puutarha oli kaunis mut tosissaan voisi vähän enemmän panostaa opastukseen. Vaikutti että opas opetellut muutamat lauseet ulkoa eikä osannut mihinkään kysymyksiin vastata. Kokonaisuudessaan ainoa tieto minkä sai oli, että jokainen presidentti tuonut alueelle omia juttujaan. Ei pahemmin muuta. Aika pettymys..
Javier Campos (2 years ago)
Kultaranta, residencia veraniega de la presidenta del país, con grandes jardines llenos de flores (en verano).
Oki Ukkola (2 years ago)
e h (2 years ago)
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