Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church

Kaunas, Lithuania

The Holy Resurrection Church is an Orthodox church built in 1862 in the area of the local Orthodox cemetery. Initially the church belonged to St. Alexander Nevsky parish, but in 1882, due to the constant growth of the number of Orthodox Russians living in the city, it was made a parish church as well. From 1884 on, the church ran a parish school. The church was closed after the Germans entered to Kaunas during World War I. As soon as Lithuania regained independence, the new government confiscated all the Orthodox churches in Kaunas, regarding them as signs of intensive Russification, leaving only the smallest one - the Holy Resurrection Church - in the hands of the Russian Orthodox Church. In 1923 the church was renovated and reconsecrated by the Lithuanian Orthodox metropolitan Elevferiy (Bogojavlensky). At the same time, the church was elevated to the rank of the cathedral of Vilnius and all Lithuania Orthodox diocese, despite its small dimensions. This decision was influenced by the territorial disputes over Vilnius Region with the Second Polish Republic. Although Metropolitan Elevferiy was forced to move to Kaunas, the name of the diocese was never changed.

The metropolitan soon realised that the small church could not serve as the cathedral and wanted to enlarge it. He set up a special commission that was to choose the best project of this transformation. However, in 1930 the idea was abandoned, because the local government agreed to support financially the construction of a new Orthodox cathedral. The Annunciation Cathedral was therefore built between 1932 and 1935, in the neighbourhood of the Holy Resurrection Church. Right after its consecration this church lost the cathedral status and was transformed into an auxiliary church, with services held only during the major feasts.

In 1947 the Soviet government agreed to open the church, which was to function just like before the war. In 1957 the building was renovated. However, only four years later the local government decided that the Annunciation parish did not need two churches and turned the Holy Resurrection church into an office. All the original church equipment was transferred to the cathedral. In 2000, the church was given back to the Orthodox diocese, but it is still closed, with only one icon kept inside to stress the sacral character of the place.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1862
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tolik Senin (40 days ago)
Очень хорошая церковь.
Александр Кривенко (2 months ago)
Благодатное место для души,ищущей покой и умиротворение!!!!!
Igor Rinkevic (7 months ago)
Тихое спокойное место. Православная церковь в Каунасе. Открыта каждый день.
Renatorius D (9 months ago)
Amazing Blessing Maria icon
Dr. Harsha vardhan reddy (2 years ago)
Beautiful and peaceful
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

Since the war, the famous altar of Hans Memling has been in the medieval collection of the St. Annen Museum, but notable polyptychs remain in the cathedral.

In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.