Alexander Nevsky Lavra

Saint Petersburg, Russia

Saint Alexander Nevsky Lavra or Saint Alexander Nevsky Monastery was founded by Peter I of Russia in 1710 at the eastern end of the Nevsky Prospekt in St. Petersburg supposing that that was the site of the Neva Battle in 1240 when Alexander Nevsky, a prince, defeated the Swedes; however, the battle actually took place about 12 miles away from that site. The monastery was founded also to house the relics of St. Alexander Nevsky, patron of the newly-founded Russian capital; however, the massive silver sarcophagus of St. Alexander Nevsky was relocated during Soviet times to the State Hermitage Museum where it remains (without the relics) today.

In 1797, the monastery was raised to the rank of lavra, making it only the third lavra in the Russian Church, in which that designation had previously been bestowed only upon Kiev Monastery of the Caves and the Trinity Monastery of St Sergius.

The monastery grounds contain two baroque churches, designed by father and son Trezzini and built in 1717–22 and 1742–50, respectively; a majestic Neoclassical cathedral, built in 1778–90 to a design by Ivan Starov and consecrated to the Holy Trinity; and numerous structures of lesser importance. It also contains the Lazarev and Tikhvin Cemeteries, where ornate tombs of Leonhard Euler,Mikhail Lomonosov, Alexander Suvorov, Nikolay Karamzin, Modest Mussorgsky, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Karl Ivanovic Rossi, Prince Garsevan Chavchavadze, a Georgian aristocrat, Sergei Witte and other famous Russians are preserved.

Today Alexander Nevsky Lavra sits on Alexander Nevsky Square where shoppers can buy bread baked by the monks. Visitors may also visit the cathedral and cemeteries for a small admission fee. While many of the grave sites are situated behind large concrete walls, especially those of famous Russians, many can be seen by passers-by while strolling down Obukovskoy Oburoni Street.

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Details

Founded: 1710
Category: Religious sites in Russia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anastasia Ovchinnikova (5 months ago)
Very close the A Nevskiy square metro station, quiet historical religious spot. Opposite is peaceful memorial cemetery
Hobart Rocswell (5 months ago)
Very beautiful and old, calm place when less people there..
Erick Flores (5 months ago)
Very beautiful monastery showing the real beauty of this country. There are many things to see here and I suggest to see every church inside. I fell in love with everything. I truly recommend to come visit this beautiful place.
Yusuf Araba (10 months ago)
Very underrated place. So beautiful, so peaceful, so historical and valuable. Literally admirable.
Igor Naglić (2 years ago)
Very nice monastery at the top of Nevsky street. Walking to the monastery you will find entrance to two cemetery-museums with famous people buried there. Walking on you will go through a gate in a cemetery and in the middle is a monastery. You can buy lots of souvenirs, mostly iconography and books.
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