The State Russian Museum (formerly the Russian Museum of His Imperial Majesty Alexander III) is the largest depository of Russian fine art in St Petersburg. The museum was established in 1895, upon enthronement of Nicholas II to commemorate his father, Alexander III. Its original collection was composed of artworks taken from the Hermitage Museum, Alexander Palace, and the Imperial Academy of Arts. After the Russian Revolution of 1917, many private collections were nationalized and relocated to the Russian Museum. These included Kazimir Malevich's Black Square.

The main building of the museum is the Mikhailovsky Palace, a splendid Neoclassical residence of Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich, erected in 1819-25 to a design by Carlo Rossi on Square of Arts in St Petersburg. Upon the death of the Grand Duke the residence was named after his wife as the Palace of the Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna, and became famous for its many theatrical presentations and balls.

Some of the halls of the palace retain the Italianate opulent interiors of the former imperial residence. Other buildings assigned to the Russian museum include the Summer Palace of Peter I (1710–14), the Marble Palace of Count Orlov (1768–85), St Michael's Castle of Emperor Paul (1797–1801), and the Rastrelliesque Stroganov Palace on the Nevsky Prospekt (1752–54).

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Founded: 1895
Category: Museums in Russia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

HL RFareham (7 months ago)
Beautiful museum. Went today and it was wonderful to be free of crowds. The building and setting are lovely. Staff speak English, which is helpful when you get lost and can't find the cloakroom. Highly recommend
321conquer (7 months ago)
Really cool place to see inside. Izi. travel works perfect inside, unfortunately only in Russian. Complex launch not for visitors during working day was the only real minus. All other exceed expectation included but not limited to exposition and Palace itself. Hope this helps@
Anne Field (7 months ago)
A beautiful building centrally located in St Petersburg, with a good fine art collection varying in periods. The building and the interiors are absolutely gorgeous. This is a great museum to visit in addition to the Hermitage. The coat check is very efficient (a necessary step when visiting) but the bathrooms definitely left something to be desired.
Raphael de Kadt (9 months ago)
A magnificent collection of Russian - pre-1917, post 1991 and Soviet era artworks. Unsurpassed in scope. A fascinating museum for those who wish to learn about Russian history. Also sports a splendid restaurant!
Frecky Lewis (10 months ago)
This museum is a must-visit if you are in St. Petersburg and have even a remote interest in art. Yes, the Hermitage is amazing, so this museum sort of takes a back seat, but I spent a splendid afternoon here taking in centuries of Russian art. It's fascinating to see how the artwork here parallels, contrasts with, and was influenced by western European art from the same time periods.
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