Bronze Horseman Statue

Saint Petersburg, Russia

The Bronze Horseman is an equestrian statue of Peter the Great in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Commissioned by Catherine the Great, it was created by the French sculptor Étienne Maurice Falconet. It is also the name of a narrative poem written by Aleksander Pushkin about the statue in 1833, widely considered to be one of the most significant works of Russian literature. The statue came to be known as the Bronze Horseman because of the poem's great influence and success. The statue is now one of the symbols of Saint Petersburg, in much the same way that the Statue of Liberty is a symbol of New York City. Both of them were designed and built by French artists.

The statue's pedestal is the enormous Thunder Stone, claimed to be the largest stone ever moved by man (1,250 t). In its original state the stone weighed about 1500 tonnes. It was carved during transportation to its current site.

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Founded: 1770-1782
Category: Statues in Russia

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sebastian Kluth (2 years ago)
The Bronze Horseman is a stunning statue of Peter the Great situated in the beautiful Senate Square. The statue's pedestal is believed to have been the largest stone ever moved by humans. It's the most beautiful statue in the entire city and definitely worth a detour.
Eugene Eremchenko (3 years ago)
One kf the most recognized monuments in Russia with rich history. Amazing landscape and quite modern design even now...
Eugene Eremchenko (3 years ago)
One kf the most recognized monuments in Russia with rich history. Amazing landscape and quite modern design even now...
Oleg Naumov (3 years ago)
Buildings of Senate and Synod built in 1829-1834 by Russian Architect Carlo di Giovanni Rossi (1775-1849) who was born in Naples but became Russian subject as many other Italians in XV - XIX centuries and Monument to Emperor Peter I (1672-1725) aka Peter the Great made in 1768-1770 by French sculptor Etienne Maurice Falcone (1716-1791) but head of the statue was sculpted by French woman Marie-Anne Collot (1748-1821). That equestrian statue is better known as The Copper Horseman. Saint Petersburg,
Oleg Naumov (3 years ago)
Buildings of Senate and Synod built in 1829-1834 by Russian Architect Carlo di Giovanni Rossi (1775-1849) who was born in Naples but became Russian subject as many other Italians in XV - XIX centuries and Monument to Emperor Peter I (1672-1725) aka Peter the Great made in 1768-1770 by French sculptor Etienne Maurice Falcone (1716-1791) but head of the statue was sculpted by French woman Marie-Anne Collot (1748-1821). That equestrian statue is better known as The Copper Horseman. Saint Petersburg, ?? Russian Federation ??. July 25, 2020.
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