The Marquises Palace (Het Markiezenhof) is one of the most beautiful examples of a late Gothic city palace to be found anywhere in Western Europe. It was built in the late 15th century by the famous Flemish master builders Anthonie and Rombout Keldermans as the residential palace of the Lords and Marquises of Bergen op Zoom.

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Founded: 1485
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Netherlands

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Xeni Moon (11 months ago)
Beautiful museum
Amy Dons (14 months ago)
Beautiful middleage palace in the city center of the old town of Bergen op Zoom. Great gardens and art exhibitions as well. And don't forget the funfair exhibition on the attic.
Cátia Pereira (16 months ago)
Has potential for more. The gardens were not well cared. They don't have any explanation in English. All the information is in dutch. A huge lack. Some of the rooms are very interesting to watch.
Sylvain de Crom (17 months ago)
I proposed here! Great spot to propose (I guess pretty good to get married as well, but we did that elsewhere). Try to visit during the culinary festival proef mei
Wesley Günter (18 months ago)
A lovely Dutch palace, love this place!
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