Sofia Albertina Church

Landskrona, Sweden

The construction of Sofia Albertina Church began in 1754 by the design of Carl Hårleman and it was inaugurated in 1788. It is named after the sister of Gustav III of Sweden. Sofia Albertina replaced the medieval church from the 1400s. The church has unusual design, because it has two towers but it's not a cathedral of bishop's seat.

The font dates from the 12th century. It was a used as a fountain in local family's garden until they noticed its value. Chandeliers were moved from the old church and they date from the 1600s.

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Details

Founded: 1754-1788
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

renembrink@gmail.com Brink (3 years ago)
New style of building, neo gothic with accent in brick laying technics.
renembrink@gmail.com Brink (3 years ago)
New style of building, neo gothic with accent in brick laying technics.
Thomas Bremnes (3 years ago)
Beautiful church great acoustics peaceful and free parking close by
Thomas Bremnes (3 years ago)
Beautiful church great acoustics peaceful and free parking close by
Carl M (3 years ago)
Most beautiful hirc in Landskrona and the acoustics inside is breathtaking.
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