Lykkesholm Castle

Ørbæk, Denmark

The history of Lykkesholm Castle dates back to the 1300s. Lykkesholm was previously known as Magelund Castle, and stood on the enormous remains of a castle dating from around 1300. In the 17th century, Lykkesholm moved to its present location on the shores of the lake. The lake was dammed and water power was used to run two mills. Previously the village of Ammendrup and its six farms lay to the south of Lykkesholm, but it was razed and its fields taken over by the manor.

In 1391 Queen Margaret I (1387-1398) owned the castle – but only for a period of nine days. Because of the nobility that was against the Queens reforms, the Queen feared for Lykkesholm Castle and passed it on to her loyal esquire, who moved it to its present location.

The world-famed storyteller H. C. Andersen often spent his summers at Lykkesholm Castle. His fairy-tales was often inspired by his stay at Lykkesholm Castle which was a perfect getaway from the busy life in Copenhagen. H. C. Andersen is believed to have written several stories during his summer stays among others the well known 'The little Mermaid'.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karin Steiness (2 years ago)
Flot område at tage en gå tur, var ikke inde på slottet
Tove Schwartz (2 years ago)
Det mest fantastiske smukke og idyllisk sted specielt til ét bryllup.
Lis Sittinieri (2 years ago)
Var der til grundlovs møde med DF , dejlig dag , fin sted at holde grundlovsmøde , vejret var strålende , der var optræden om H.C Andersen . Gode taler , bare super .
Dan Andreasen (2 years ago)
Super dejligt sted i vidunderlige omgivelser.
Andreas Risøy (3 years ago)
Awesome place! :)
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