Brundlund Castle

Åbenrå, Denmark

Brundlund Castle was build 1411 by Queen Margareth I. It was used as the residence of the county prefect for several hundred years and it helped strengthening the position of the crown in Southern Jutland. The castle has been rebuilt a number of times, most recently in 1805-1807 and has fully restored in 1985. In 1998 it opened as an art museum cointaining Danish art from the 18th century to the present. Brundlund Castle Art Museum also has a collections of paintings, sculptures and graphic works.

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Details

Founded: 1411
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Denmark)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Poul Erik Kristiansen (2 years ago)
Brundlund slot der er fra 1470 til 1997 var bolig for lensmanden og siden amtmanden over Aabenraa Amt .På slottet vises skiftende udstillinger på vægt på sønderjyske kunstner Er virkeligt et besøg værd anbefales
Nicolai Langfeldt (2 years ago)
A small ... palace with a museum of modern art. The employees appeared to be volunteers. Small serving area. Interesting exhibit when we visited.
Elizabeth Lauritzen (3 years ago)
Rather disappointing much Smaller exhibition than expected
Sander Bennett Boisen (3 years ago)
With both local and international artists in a historical building this museum and the surrounding sculpture garden is quite the gem in Aabenraa.
Jeroen Wiert Pluimers (4 years ago)
Beautiful historic castle where - during the yearly Ringrider Aabenraa festival - a classical Tattoo is organised in the garden. It has a very cozy atmosphere and is very worth visiting even when no festivals are organised.
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