Brundlund Castle

Aabenraa, Denmark

Brundlund Castle was build 1411 by Queen Margareth I. It was used as the residence of the county prefect for several hundred years and it helped strengthening the position of the crown in Southern Jutland. The castle has been rebuilt a number of times, most recently in 1805-1807 and has fully restored in 1985. In 1998 it opened as an art museum cointaining Danish art from the 18th century to the present. Brundlund Castle Art Museum also has a collections of paintings, sculptures and graphic works.

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Details

Founded: 1411
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Denmark)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

AJ 1963 (2 years ago)
Small museum. Nice paintings. Good coffee.
Shurik McLaren (2 years ago)
I didn't go inside of museum, just stoped near by, and google decided that I went into museum, lol
Poul Erik Kristiansen (3 years ago)
Brundlund slot der er fra 1470 til 1997 var bolig for lensmanden og siden amtmanden over Aabenraa Amt .På slottet vises skiftende udstillinger på vægt på sønderjyske kunstner Er virkeligt et besøg værd anbefales
Nicolai Langfeldt (3 years ago)
A small ... palace with a museum of modern art. The employees appeared to be volunteers. Small serving area. Interesting exhibit when we visited.
Nicolai Langfeldt (3 years ago)
A small ... palace with a museum of modern art. The employees appeared to be volunteers. Small serving area. Interesting exhibit when we visited.
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