Sulsted Church

Sulsted, Denmark

Sulsted Church, located in Sulsted, a small Danish town in northern Jutland, just north of Aalborg, was constructed c. 1150-1200 and features a large number of frescos or kalkmalerier, all created in 1548 by Hans Maler from Randers. Unlike other frescos in Danish churches, Sulsted's murals were not concealed with limewash after the Reformation and have survived to this day. The frescos, which decorate the ceiling of the nave, depict the life of Jesus starting with his birth in the first section at the west end of the nave, continue with the beginning of his passion in the second or central section and end with his death on the cross in the third most easterly section. Those in the choir are of other New Testament images related to the creed and to the Virgin Mary.

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Details

Founded: 1150-1200
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Hyldgaard Løgtholt (2 years ago)
Beautiful church with some fantastic frescoes
Grzegorz Patrzylas (2 years ago)
Beautiful church from 1100 with amazing frescoes.
Niels Flemming Christensen (2 years ago)
Beautiful church skilled priest
Gitte Møller Pedersen (2 years ago)
Fantastic beautiful church. The priest Ane is the most sympathetic and competent priest.
Lars Rasmussen (3 years ago)
Always in order
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