Sulsted Church, located in Sulsted, a small Danish town in northern Jutland, just north of Aalborg, was constructed c. 1150-1200 and features a large number of frescos or kalkmalerier, all created in 1548 by Hans Maler from Randers. Unlike other frescos in Danish churches, Sulsted's murals were not concealed with limewash after the Reformation and have survived to this day. The frescos, which decorate the ceiling of the nave, depict the life of Jesus starting with his birth in the first section at the west end of the nave, continue with the beginning of his passion in the second or central section and end with his death on the cross in the third most easterly section. Those in the choir are of other New Testament images related to the creed and to the Virgin Mary.

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Founded: 1150-1200
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bitten Dittmer (3 months ago)
It is then a nice cemetery
Birthe (11 months ago)
Although a landmark sign by the road leads to the church, it was closed so we could not visit it inside :-(
Jacob Winther (12 months ago)
Beautiful church
Hans Justesen (19 months ago)
A beautiful old church, located on the outskirts of Hammer Bakker, with lots of great frescoes under the ceiling.
Gitte Nørlem Dreier (2 years ago)
Very beautiful church both inside and out, especially inside all the beautiful frescoes. On the outside, the church itself is very nice with the big stones, but the cemetery is also a nice little one. And then it is a very nice place, by the hammer hills. There is a really good acoustics in the church. I've just been to a concert with choral music there, and it's the most beautiful I've ever heard - I got goose bumps several times. It is very wheelchair friendly inside and so there must be another way to it, because there are stairs up to it.
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