Sulsted Church, located in Sulsted, a small Danish town in northern Jutland, just north of Aalborg, was constructed c. 1150-1200 and features a large number of frescos or kalkmalerier, all created in 1548 by Hans Maler from Randers. Unlike other frescos in Danish churches, Sulsted's murals were not concealed with limewash after the Reformation and have survived to this day. The frescos, which decorate the ceiling of the nave, depict the life of Jesus starting with his birth in the first section at the west end of the nave, continue with the beginning of his passion in the second or central section and end with his death on the cross in the third most easterly section. Those in the choir are of other New Testament images related to the creed and to the Virgin Mary.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1150-1200
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bitten Dittmer (13 months ago)
It is then a nice cemetery
Birthe (2 years ago)
Although a landmark sign by the road leads to the church, it was closed so we could not visit it inside :-(
Jacob Winther (2 years ago)
Beautiful church
Hans Justesen (2 years ago)
A beautiful old church, located on the outskirts of Hammer Bakker, with lots of great frescoes under the ceiling.
Gitte Nørlem Dreier (3 years ago)
Very beautiful church both inside and out, especially inside all the beautiful frescoes. On the outside, the church itself is very nice with the big stones, but the cemetery is also a nice little one. And then it is a very nice place, by the hammer hills. There is a really good acoustics in the church. I've just been to a concert with choral music there, and it's the most beautiful I've ever heard - I got goose bumps several times. It is very wheelchair friendly inside and so there must be another way to it, because there are stairs up to it.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.