Gammel Vraa Castle

Tylstrup, Denmark

The Gammel Vraa castle was first mentioned as a royal residence in 1553. Councillor Predbjørn Gyldenstjerne bought Vraa from the Crown in 1600 and created one of North of Jutland's grandest manors. He bred horses at the manor until in 1616 where it was inherited by his daughter Jytte who married Christian Grubbe. In 1624 she sold it to the Council of the Realm. Vraa became private property a few decades later Ide Lindenov and Steen Beck built the main wing in 1645 and decorated the facade with their coat of arms. Until the late 1700s a secret was found on the North side of the main wing. The moat encircling the castle was constructed in 1650.

Today Gammel Vraa is a hotel. Relief with the Beck and Lindenov family's coat of arms is still displayed at the building's foundation in 1645 and on the wall behind the fireplace in the salon. A motto goes: 'God's Good Spirit and Strong Hand Maintain Men and House From Drop and Gust From Hostile Violence.'

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Details

Founded: 1645
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anders Sjöberg (2 years ago)
Ok food
aurimelis tyi (2 years ago)
Cozy and nice castle, really castle!
Heine Pedersen (3 years ago)
Booked the place on a spur and it turned out to be a nice and cozy old castle. The very nice receptionist made sure we got a nice room, even if it could use a little restoration like a paint job and a new carpet. The food in the restaurant was good. The waiters were very young and inexperienced, probably because of a wedding at the hotel at the same time requiring the senior waiting staff. Overall it was a nice and pleasant stay - although at arrival, we were a bit shocked about the harsh smell of a pig farm placed right next to the hotel. But we barely noticed for the rest of the stay.
Cathrine Lund Hadley (3 years ago)
Good service, excellent food. Old, cozy place
AureJegern (3 years ago)
Nice old castle, helpful staff. The food in the resaurant was very good!
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