Battery Moltke was an uncompleted World War II coastal artillery battery. It was constructed by Organisation Todt for the Wehrmacht during the Occupation of the Channel Islands. The battery structures include bunkers, gun emplacements and the Marine Peilstand 3 tower, which are located on Les Landes, a coastal heathland area at the north end of St Ouen's Bay. The bunker was left unfinished at the end of the war, when completed there would have been an M132 Command Bunker like at Battery Lothringen and the main armament would have consisted of 4x15 cm SK C/28.The primary purpose of this battery would have been the defence of St Ouen's Bay in the event of an amphibious assault by the Allies, although Jersey's entire coastline would have been within range of the guns, as would the stretch of water between Jersey and Sark.

Four captured French 155mm cannons were located at Moltke. One of the original guns can be seen there today. The exterior areas of the site are accessible around the year. The Channel Islands Occupation Society operates some of the bunkers as a museum. One may visit the gun emplacements at any time. Two cannon barrels recovered from the foot of the near-by cliffs are on display in one of the emplacements. These two salvaged barrels were not originally located at Moltke.

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Founded: 1941
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

john leruez (2 years ago)
Quality restoration of WW2 defensive position and unique equipment
Peter Ditch (2 years ago)
A fantastic WW2 German gun battery. Plenty to see above ground and a trip into the complex when open is a must. The size and scale is amazing. I return every year..... to find out opening times for all the bunkers check out the CIOS Website
Paul Clarke (2 years ago)
Great place , smashing views . Well maintained
Paul Hiatt (2 years ago)
Excellent, well maintained and run.
Nicholas (2 years ago)
Great spot for pictures. Fascinating history in these cliffs.
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