Pagans, Pirates and Romans have all been linked with the site now occupied by Castel Church. Outside the main door can be seen the Neolithic Statue Menhir found under the floor of the church during the 19th century. At its foot lie the stone seats for the official of the medieval court of Fief St Michel. The church of ‘Our Lady of Deliverance’ to use its ancient title, was first mentioned in a papal document dated 1155. The earliest part of the church is the western half of the north aisle, dating from the last half of the 11th century or the first quarter of the 12th century.

Internally there are a number of interesting features: in the north chancel, 13th century frescos and a medieval stone credence, and an hagioscope piercing one of the tower pillars; in the south chancel, an ancient piscine, a blocked up priest’s door and a ‘hole in the wall’, thought to be the remains of a cupboard where the altar vessels were stored. Church Registers date from 1674.

Externally, growth of the building can be gauged by a number of blocked doorways and reconstructed windows. Alternatives to the church building have been accompanied by other variations which can be seen reflected in the list of Rectors. The list begins in 1262, and encompasses Roman Catholic, Presbyterian, Calvanist and Anglican clergy.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1155
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chris (6 months ago)
Really lovely old church it looks very nice at night when it's all lit up I'll have to go and take some night time photos and add them to Google maps.
Jo Gib (2 years ago)
Beautiful stone 'Grandmere' statue menhir - stands outside the church, was found years ago buried under the church entrance steps - a foundation sacrifice perhaps...!? Church also has interesting wall paintings and a bell pit - very rare!
Marion 1967 (2 years ago)
Fresco 13th century of the 3 living and the 3 dead.
Leigh Haines (2 years ago)
Nice place to be buried
Flozie Baker (3 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Bamberg Historic City Centre

Bamberg is located in Upper Franconia on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main. Its historic city center is a listed UNESCO world heritage site.

Bamberg is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a 'second Rome'. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg extends over seven hills, each crowned by a beautiful church. This has led to Bamberg being called the 'Franconian Rome'.