Ardenne is the third largest abbey in Caen region. It was founded in 1121 by a small Christian community. During the 1789 Revolution, the religious community was expelled from Ardenne Abbey, the building's original purpose was modified and it was stripped of the furniture and works of art which had been collected.

On 7 June 1944, the second day of Normandy Invasion, the Germans took Canadian soldiers prisoner and escorted them to the abbey where eighteen of them were executed, in contempt of the Geneva Convention and prisoners’ rights. Other summary executions took place during this month of fighting. The abbey was taken back from the Germans on 8 July 1944. Today, a memorial at the site commemorates this tragic event. In 1994, on the initiative of the Regional Council, a first wave of restoration and development works were launched at the farinier, the stables, Bayeux gate and the main building.

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Details

Founded: 1121
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.caen-tourisme.fr

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gr3nZ I (6 months ago)
Très bonne accueil, visite très intéressante, lieu magnifique, pour les passionnés d'histoire, foncez vers cette endroit !
malika regaia (6 months ago)
Bel endroit à visiter. Des expos temporaires qui sont très bien réalisées. La dernière en date, Récits du monde vaut la peine. Vous pourrez y lire des feuillets manuscrits des mains de Rimbaud et de Levi-Strauss mais aussi et surtout le passeport de Frantz Fanon.
jerome guilbert (6 months ago)
Lieu charge d histoires a visiter humblement.ne surtout pas oublier le petit square ( juste derrière abbaye) canadien lieu de receuillement .Ce lieu et mémoriel et bien expliqué par des panneaux d information.
Audrey (6 months ago)
Endroit magique ! Magnifique parc, abbaye, bibliothèque. A y retourner au printemps pour redécouvrir le potager .
Bach Johann Sebastien (7 months ago)
Lieu glauque. On se demande comment on peut gaspiller autant d'argent public pour si peu d'intérêt
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