Kulturkirken Jakob

Oslo, Norway

Kulturkirken Jakob (Jakob Church of Culture) was designed by architect Georg Andreas Bull and built in 1880. The altarpiece of the building year by Eilif Peterssen and shows the adoring shepherds. In the porch hangs a relief of the Archangel Michael. The church, with 600 seats, served as the parish church of Jakob parish until 1985, when it was closed by the due to building restoration. The church was reopened in February 2000 as a church of culture, directed by Kirkelig Kulturverksted for long term rental of the Church of Norway.

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Address

Hausmanns gate 14, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1880
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

www.jakob.no
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yerlan Akhmetov (14 months ago)
Nice architecture!
Alvaro Ramirez (18 months ago)
Beautiful church and park. Close to Eventyr brua. A solid rock bridge over the central river and a long road full of trees and natural resources and some fauna.
Alex Sch (2 years ago)
Beautiful old church. Great atmosphere
Tor Arne Romma (3 years ago)
Nice place. Recommend first floor for concerts for a better sound experience.
Suman Das (3 years ago)
I don't like party inside church. It's a great place. Need more care prayers and love for God.
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