Kulturkirken Jakob

Oslo, Norway

Kulturkirken Jakob (Jakob Church of Culture) was designed by architect Georg Andreas Bull and built in 1880. The altarpiece of the building year by Eilif Peterssen and shows the adoring shepherds. In the porch hangs a relief of the Archangel Michael. The church, with 600 seats, served as the parish church of Jakob parish until 1985, when it was closed by the due to building restoration. The church was reopened in February 2000 as a church of culture, directed by Kirkelig Kulturverksted for long term rental of the Church of Norway.

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Address

Hausmanns gate 14, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1880
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

www.jakob.no
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vidar Berentsen Folden (18 months ago)
Really stylish! Beautiful place for hosting an event!
Nelson Beleza (2 years ago)
Nice place
Jonas B Olsen (2 years ago)
Fantastic arena for music and art
Bjørn Olav Samdal (2 years ago)
A open church with concerts and a nice sound-feeling inside. The place is recommended for listening to a show.
Roger Larsen (2 years ago)
Nice and central church. Went there on the ByLarm concert this March. Great venue. They really cater to people's needs. The soundguy though didn't take into account the acoustics of the church. Way too loud. Could barely hear a word uttered by the last performers Skambankt. Top remarks to the church... which isn't really a church.
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