Trinity Church

Oslo, Norway

The Trinity Church (Trefoldighetskirken) is one of the largest churches in Oslo (1000 seats). The church itself is in the raw red brick, while the vaults, arches and small columns have gray scale color. The nave is octagonal with a Greek cross superimposed, with the choir in the apse, shallow transept and rectangular entrance flanked by two slender, octagonal bell towers. A central dome rises above the church.

The Trinity Church was consecrated in 1858 by Bishop Jens Lauritz Arup. The church has a neo-Gothic central plant, with two towers and eight-sided dome, and was designed by architect Alexis de Chateauneuf (Hamburg, Germany), but some time after the work was entrusted to his pupil Wilhelm von Hanno, who made some modifications to the original plans and put his personal stamp on the details of interior decoration. The main body (1872) is the work of Claus Jensen, the altarpiece (1866) is a painting by Adolph Tidemand (the Baptism of Jesus), chandeliers were designed by Emanuel Vigeland in 1923, and Frøydis Haavardsholm was the designer of the stained glass windows.

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Address

Akersgata 60, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1858
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yanal AlSunna' (13 months ago)
Beautiful and spectacular
Juyin Inamdar (2 years ago)
Looks impressive from outside. Couldn’t really enter the place.
Maria Theresa Nordahl (2 years ago)
This is a beautiful and historical church. And totally worth the visit⛪️.
Pete Livene (3 years ago)
Beauty
Ivan Kotov (3 years ago)
It was closed. But outside it was prefekt.
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