Château de la Bourbansais

Pleugueneuc, France

Château de la Bourbansais was built in in 1583 by Jean du Breil. At this time, the château was smaller than today. It was only composed of the façade and the two towers. The first modifications was made in the seventeenth century, with the construction of the west façade, in front of the french gardens. Then, in the 18th century, the family d’Armaillé, wanted to receive their guests with fast and luxury to show their power. They added the two wings, French gardens and the ground floor was transformed in french salons for receptions. The two wings were the apartments of the guests who could stay here more than a month. The façade is said “Renaissance” because the large symmetry with the windows. The donjon and the ditches date from the Middle Ages.

Today there is a zoo in the lands of château.

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Founded: 1583
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cliff Heskins (4 months ago)
Great place to take the family and especially the children. Will planned and the animals look well looked after and have plenty of space. The chateau is beautiful with it's surrounding grounds
Lee Workman (11 months ago)
Massively over priced. 95 euro entry for a family of 4 and that didn't include entry to the (modest) chateau . Zoo was OK but small with a limited number of species. Cafe was another total rip off , charging 9 euro for a half filled baguette. Only saving grace was the bird display which was pretty good. Overall, very poor value for money - wouldn't go again.
Liz Mildenhall (11 months ago)
We enjoyed a great day out as a family of 5 (3 children aged 6, 6 and 9). We didn't visit the chateau, but still had a full day seeing all the animals, watching both shows and playing in the play area. The inflatables were great and our kids had them to themselves for about 20 minutes at the start of the day!
Martin Broadhurst (12 months ago)
The Zoo is an absolute delight! The animal enclosures are fantastic, and they have regular shows like dog shows and giraffe feedings. The ice creams and refreshments are delicious, and parking is ample. The up-close enclosures with lemurs and various bird species are a real treat. Highly recommended!
Anna Kotyk (2 years ago)
Travelled with toddler and strolle in October. This is a jack pot! Gorgeous place, good toddler food in a restaurant ( though yeah coffee is expensive but it's understandable, everything else is pretty cheap) -You can get some special popcorn at the entrance and feed the farm animals( no outside food ). Horseee was demanding the popcorn !:) -They have several playgrounds and a bonus free bouncing castle.though it was wet in the morning so plan to hit that the in afternoon. -Lots of interesting animals to watch, all very well taken care of and with a lot of space for them. Lemurs are so great !!! -All shows start after 2:30. -For us we wanted to hit a nap in a stroller and planned to start early, then food, then us walking with him in a stroller, then more stuff. Kiddo was Soo excited that didn't sleep untill 3 so we skipped the nap ;) Views of the residence is stunning !! Good for adults too.
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