Château de Saint-Aubin-du-Cormier

Saint-Aubin-du-Cormier, France

The ruins of the castle of Saint-Aubin-of-Cormier point out a significant event of Breton history. Affected by the catch of Saint-Aubin, François II, Duke of Brittany, an army of 11000 men constitutes to take again the places. During the famous battle of July 28, 1488, the French troops embank their adversaries. This event announces the end of independence of Brittany which will concretize itself with the marriage Anne of Brittany and Charles VIII. Having lost its defensive interest, the castle was going to be destroyed, except the face is keep, turned towards France winner. The fortress included a whole of 10 turns including one formidable keep and formed a quadrilateral of 100 meters out of 30. There remains only the northern half of the keep and the bases of the others turns. One also finds some scraps of the main building and the wall of the vault. The external enclosure, integrated now in constructions of the borough, keeps the trace of three grosses towers in half-moon and the southern rampart which dominates the pond.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

www.casteland.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Woz Woz (13 months ago)
Très bel endroit
Haxo De La Legende De La Ville d'Ys (13 months ago)
Superbe. Ballade agréable
Karine Maudet (2 years ago)
Pour des personnes handicapées, difficultés d'y accéder. D'un côté, trop de marches. De l'autre, la pente est un peu raide pour des fauteuils roulants. L'accès à la pente est quelquefois difficile, car des voitures stationnent devant.
Céline Van (2 years ago)
Château très en ruine! Il ne reste pas grand chose à voir. Attention à la sécurité
Shaun Watson (7 years ago)
Ruined castle mostly hidden in the woods. A ruined tower is still visible from a small park.
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