Panagia Apsinthiotissa Monastery

Pentadaktylos, Cyprus

Panagia Apsinthiotissa or Absinthiotissa is a Greek Orthodox monastery probably established in the 11h or 12th century as a Byzantine imperial foundation and continued to enjoy a degree of prominence in the Lusignan and Venetian periods. Leontios, the abbot in about 1222, was one of the delegates sent to report the plight of the Orthodox Church under Latin jurisdiction to the Patriarch Germanos II in the Empire of Nicaea. Neophytus, Archbishop of Cyprus, was also in Nicaea at the time, having been banished by the Latin authorities for refusing to take an oath of obedience to the Roman Pontiff. Boustronios tells us that the Queen of Cyprus worshipped at the monastery in 1486, the implication being that Panagia Apsinthiotissa was under the Roman Church. He also reports that pilgrimages were made to Apinthi and Antiphonitis on the fifteenth of August by all the people of Kyrenia. After the Ottoman conquest, the monastery became the property of the Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem and subordinate to the nearby Monastery of Saint Chrysostom in Koutsoventis.

The main church of the monastery appears to have been built in the 12th century and has a cross-in-square plan of the Byzantine type surmounted by a high dome. The narthex, on the west side, has simple Gothic rib vaulting and probably dates to the 15th century. Writing in 1918, George Jeffery describes the establishment as a ruin.

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Pentadaktylos, Cyprus
See all sites in Pentadaktylos

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Husafettin Karateke (10 months ago)
Muhteşem biryer..
oya kutsal (10 months ago)
It is a wonderful church with fantastic view but unfortunately it is neglected.
tetraviz cyprus (14 months ago)
11. Yy a dayanan bir tarih.
Jens (18 months ago)
This church is nicely placed with a grand view of Nicosia. The building was abandoned many decades ago, and has been cleaned out inside. Close by there is a picknic site for those interested.
andreas philipou (22 months ago)
Absolutely stunning views. The monastery is located in a perfect position overlooking the mesaoria plain all the way from areas beyond Nicosia, as far as Stavrovouni monastery, and towards Famagusta. Restoration work is being done. Beautiful area just above the village of Vouno (Βουνο).
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