Panagia Apsinthiotissa Monastery

Pentadaktylos, Cyprus

Panagia Apsinthiotissa or Absinthiotissa is a Greek Orthodox monastery probably established in the 11h or 12th century as a Byzantine imperial foundation and continued to enjoy a degree of prominence in the Lusignan and Venetian periods. Leontios, the abbot in about 1222, was one of the delegates sent to report the plight of the Orthodox Church under Latin jurisdiction to the Patriarch Germanos II in the Empire of Nicaea. Neophytus, Archbishop of Cyprus, was also in Nicaea at the time, having been banished by the Latin authorities for refusing to take an oath of obedience to the Roman Pontiff. Boustronios tells us that the Queen of Cyprus worshipped at the monastery in 1486, the implication being that Panagia Apsinthiotissa was under the Roman Church. He also reports that pilgrimages were made to Apinthi and Antiphonitis on the fifteenth of August by all the people of Kyrenia. After the Ottoman conquest, the monastery became the property of the Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem and subordinate to the nearby Monastery of Saint Chrysostom in Koutsoventis.

The main church of the monastery appears to have been built in the 12th century and has a cross-in-square plan of the Byzantine type surmounted by a high dome. The narthex, on the west side, has simple Gothic rib vaulting and probably dates to the 15th century. Writing in 1918, George Jeffery describes the establishment as a ruin.

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Pentadaktylos, Cyprus
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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Justin Tapp (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, completely neglected now. Part of a picnic area with a walking trail.
Aytan Sami (2 years ago)
Fresh air lovely view
Sotiris (3 years ago)
Magnificent remains of an orthodox monastery. There are some wall paintings left. The rest were stolen to be sold abroad. Located in a private area so access may not be possible
Polat Kocatli (3 years ago)
Very nice place
Husafettin Karateke (3 years ago)
Muhteşem biryer..
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