The Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam is a museum for modern art, contemporary art and design. The 19th century building was designed by Adriaan Willem Weissman and the 21st century wing with the current entrance was designed by Benthem Crouwel Architects.

The collection comprises modern and contemporary art and design from the early 20th century up to the 21st century. It features artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Wassily Kandinsky, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Marc Chagall, Henri Matisse, Jackson Pollock, Karel Appel, Andy Warhol, Willem de Kooning, Marlene Dumas, Lucio Fontana, and Gilbert & George.

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Founded: 1874
Category: Museums in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olivia Ch (19 days ago)
My favourite museum in Amsterdam and one of the favourites overall. Always something interesting, and additionally there are a lot of famous modernist painters exhibited here. Came here a few times and will continue coming
Kannan Siva (20 days ago)
Well constructed spaces in an interesting space. Currently reflection on digital age and doesn't flinch on war around us. Preferred the installations. Overall very good food for thought.
Amy D (37 days ago)
Great design pieces, each room was quiet different from the one to the next. Some rooms should have more warnings about lighting or noise for those who may have issues with it. Interesting and at times interactive. Large rooms and easy to explore.
Marcel Van Doorn (2 months ago)
Very depressive museum. It doesn't give any creative inspiration. The management should invest in a completely new modern experience, to bring the famous paintings to life.
Ray Hitchcock (2 months ago)
This is a great modern art museum. The special exhibits it has are the the best staged and designed exhibits. I am educated, entertained, and informed every time that I visit. It has its own collection on display and visiting art - all displayed in a variety of room to enormous to intimate.
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