Rembrandt House Museum

Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Rembrandt House Museum is a house in the Jodenbreestraat, where Rembrandt lived and painted for a number of years. A few years ago the house was thoroughly reconstructed on the inside to show how the house would have looked in Rembrandt's days. Adjoining (and linked to) the house is a modern building where work of Rembrandt is on display, mainly etchings and also a part of his collection of objects from all over the world.

Rembrandt purchased the house in 1639 and lived there until he went bankrupt in 1656, when all his belongings went on auction. The auction list enabled the reconstructions of all his belongings which are also on display in the house.

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Details

Founded: 1911
Category: Museums in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Meechan (20 months ago)
Great learning about artists and how they went about their business in Rembrandt’s time. More info than you expect! The audio guide system is really simple to use.
Katka Valentinska (20 months ago)
For me this was the educational highlight in Amsterdam. With an established love for details this house shows an authentic approach to the life and work of Rembrandt. The employees were SO nice and we could ask a lot of questions about the artistic techniques and the historic background. Furthermore the demonstrations of etching/printing and the mixing of colors were amazing! Thank you for an amazing visit. And shoutout to the compassionate employees who were so helpful and friendly.
Sean Poulton (21 months ago)
Interesting experience to see how Rembrandt once lived. You will see some great pieces of art by various artists. Takes anywhere between 45 minutes to 2 hours to see depending on your pace.
Luis MC (21 months ago)
Simply one of the best Museums in Amsterdam. Even if you're not into Rembrandt you will see the man behind the artist. The collector, the businessman, the master, the family man, the art dealer and the craftsmanship from 17th century. Lockers are free which is a nice touch, and the audio guide is a must and is included in the price unlike other places. Fun fact: the Dutch version of the audio guide is somewhat different from the other languages.
Natasha Halvorson (2 years ago)
It was a pleasant surprise how much I enjoyed Rembrandt House Museum. This is a self guided tour and was not crowded when we visited. We were able to see two live demonstrations: color mixing on stone and printing making with etchings. Both were really insightful. The house itself is amazing and you get to learn about the life and works of Rembrandt and his pupils in each room. I liked that it was self-paced and leisurely. We got to roam around in no particular order, unlike Anne Frank House. I would recommend the I Amsterdam City Pass as this was included in the available attractions.
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