Hermitage Amsterdam

Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Hermitage Amsterdam is the Dutch branch of the world-famous Hermitage in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The Hermitage Amsterdam is an exhibition space and cultural education centre with a focus on Russian history and culture. It displays rotating selections of pieces from the Hermitage collection in Russia. These include paintings, graphic works, sculptures, applied art and archaeological discoveries. Hermitage Amsterdam has a special children’s section and regularly holds workshops focused on fun and creativity.

Tsar Peter had a special relationship with Amsterdam, having lived in the city for several years. He founded the very first public museum in Russia, and some of the exhibits at the original Hermitage were items he acquired in the Netherlands. Back then, the museum offered visitors a free shot of vodka to entice them inside.

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Category: Museums in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

A Google User (17 months ago)
A total must see when visiting Amsterdam. Such beautiful paintings, interactive presentations with projections over the art. 6 language voice tour guide. You'll learn how the Dutch people have loved and how strong the Dutch women are.
A Google User (18 months ago)
What a lovely museum! The museum isn't too big, which makes it easy to go through in half a day. The exhibits provide wonderful insight into Amsterdam during the Dutch Golden Age, with relevant examples of life back then. Audioguides are free and a music tour is also available. The museum has a great restaurant with good food at a reasonable price.
A Google User (18 months ago)
I really enjoyed my visit to this museum, the shop had some great replica plaster busts which I could leave without buying. The cafe and restaurant had lovely menu. the Sculpture exhibit was brilliantly presented, The Three Graces were breath taking. I had a lovely time.
A Google User (18 months ago)
An interesting place but overpriced. When we were there the self guiding information headphones in English were not working at all. Staff did not really care, no help there. Whole place is traveling exhibits and some permanent ones such as the local paintings. We liked it but in truth there was not much content to be had.
A Google User (2 years ago)
Awesome museum. Always Nice to go and visit. Very frequent change in collection which makes it fun to go back. The cafe in museum is also very nice and clean with friendly staff.
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