Dutch Resistance Museum

Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Dutch Resistance Museum (Verzetsmuseum) tells the story of the Dutch people in World War II. From 14 May 1940 to 5 May 1945, the Netherlands were occupied by Nazi Germany. The permanent exhibition recreates the atmosphere of the streets of Amsterdam during the German occupation of the World War II. Big photographs, old posters, objects, films and sounds from that horrible time, help to recreate the scene. The background of the Holocaust is visualized to the visitor. This is an exhibition about the everyday life during that time, but also about exceptional historical events, resistance of the population against the Nazis and heroism.

The building bearing the Star of David and the name of Petrus Plancius (1550-1622), the Renaissance Amsterdam clergyman and geographer, was built in 1876 by the Jewish singing society Oefening Baart Kunst. It served for several decades as a Jewish cultural center and synagogue. The Oefening Baart Kunst society kept the Plancius name on its building to underline its respect to the Amsterdam city traditions. That was the name of the old house which stood on this spot before. For a long time Plancius building served in many different functions. Since 1999, after its renovation, it is the seat of the Verzetsmuseum.

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Category: Museums in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

A Google User (12 months ago)
Great historical museum in Amsterdam. They have an excellent collection of stories that create a picture of the tragety that happened in Amsterdam during WWII. General information as well as individual accounts focusing on Amsterdam during WWII. A must for any history lover. Well laid out, easy to follow flow, packed with information. Small museum, big experience.
A Google User (12 months ago)
Detailed and interesting collection. Doesn’t get boring. It’s a bit dark, but I didn’t mind. You should definitely go, you won’t be disappointed!
A Google User (13 months ago)
Fascinating exhibition on the struggle of the Dutch people under German occupation with stories of those who resisted or collaborated with an abundance of primary source documentation on display and artifacts. The showing of archival footage is also fascinating with many interesting images of the terrible times of the past and artifacts to remind us of its impact. Very powerful museum and highly educational, I would absolutely recommend coming here.
A Google User (13 months ago)
Amazing! A lot of information and the prices aren’t crazy either. It has its own kids section which my little brother loved! Would totally recommend!
A Google User (2 years ago)
Great museum, both info and what's on display. I was there for 2 hours and didn't even get to half of the content, so be sure to plan accordingly. The free audio books were really helpful and it was handy that they allowed you choose to get more information at each station, rather than forcing you to listen to everything.
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