Westerkerk ('Western church') was one of the first purposely built Protestant churches. Today the Westerkerk remains the largest church in the Netherlands that was built for Protestants. In was built in 1620-1631 after a design by the late Renaissance architect Hendrick de Keyser in the Dutch Renaissance style and in the form of a patriarchal cross.

The spire, called the Westertoren ('Western tower'), is the highest church tower in Amsterdam, at 85 meters. The crown topping the spire is the Imperial Crown of Austria of Maximilian I. The church bells were made by François Hemony in 1648.

Rembrandt van Rijn was buried in the Westerkerk on October 8, 1669. The exact location of the grave is unknown, but presumed to be somewhere along the northern wall. Other painters buried in the Westerkerk are Nicolaes Berchem, Gillis d'Hondecoeter, Melchior d'Hondecoeter and Govert Flinck. The church organ is decorated with doors painted by Gerard de Lairesse.

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Founded: 1620-1631
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

A Google User (3 years ago)
Amazing centuries old church where Rembrandt was buried. The outside is beautiful and the architecture is stunning. Loved my visit.
A Google User (3 years ago)
Always a good sermon and the church service is always perfect . Coffee after service is perfect.
A Google User (3 years ago)
Good park to ride a bike, take some photos or just chill. I recommend it
A Google User (4 years ago)
Fantastic from the outside but pretty bare on the inside. The floor stones are interesting but no information on them. The organ was playing so a nice sound. Worth a look though..
A Google User (4 years ago)
Tours fill up quick because they only take 6 people every half hour. The guide was very well informed about the history of the tower. Few things to note; the tour only goes up half way up the tower and the steps become steep like ladders at the top. But I would still recommended it!
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