The Munttoren ('Coin Tower') was originally part of the Regulierspoort, one of the main gates in Amsterdam's medieval city wall. The gate, built in the years 1480, consisted of two towers and a guard house. The name of the tower refers to the fact that it was used to mint coins in the 17th century.

After the gate went up in flames in a 1618 fire, only the guard house and part of the western tower remained standing. The tower was then rebuilt in Amsterdam Renaissance style in 1620, with an eight-sided top half and elegant open spire designed by Hendrick de Keyser, featuring a clockwork with four clockfaces and a carillon of bells.

The carillon was made in 1668 by Pieter Hemony, who added new bells to the instrument that he and his brother François had made earlier for the tower of the Amsterdam stock exchange in 1651. In 1873, the original baton keyboard was removed from the carillon, in favor of changes to the clockwork mechanism. In 1960 a manual playing system and a manual baton keyboard was re-installed. The current carillon consists of 38 bells. A mechanism causes the bells to chime every quarter of an hour.

The guard house is not the original medieval structure but a 19th century replica. The original guard house, which had survived the fire of 1618 relatively unscathed, was replaced with a new building during 1885-1887 in Neo-Renaissance style. An underpass was added to the building during a 1938-1939 renovation.

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Founded: 1620
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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A Google User (15 months ago)
Mint Tower (Munttoren) is a historic structure in central Amsterdam, situated at Muntplein, where the Singel Canal pours into the Amstel River. This was originally a gate that formed part of the city. It was built in 1480. Unfortunately, the the gate was badly damaged by fire in 1618, leaving only the guard house and part of the original tower. Dutch architect, Hendrick de Keyser, rebuilt the tower in 1620,in Dutch Renaissance style, including a clock face and carillon of bells, which can still be heard to this day. Interestingly, the tower building was used as a mint in the late 17th century, giving it the name it is referred to today. Now, you'll find a Royal Delft earthenware shop occupying the bottom floor of the Munttoren. Fans of architecture and historic buildings will enjoy seeing Munttoren, which can be quickly and conveniently viewed while sightseeing in the Eastern Canal Ring area of the city.
A Google User (15 months ago)
Nice place and can recomand it to all
A Google User (15 months ago)
Nice landmark with enough around it to deserve a visit.
A Google User (2 years ago)
This clock tower pumps out all the good bell jams.
A Google User (2 years ago)
Old tower standing at a busy crossroads of people trams, buses and autos. Near the Flower Market and shopping area on the Kalverstraat, busy area,lots of shops. Also known as the Mint Tower, it is a remaining part of the old city wall and this gate was part of the old city wall. I just saw it from the street, that was good enough for me. I didn't go in and I'm not sure if you even can. Quite interesting to look, but if you stand too close you can't see all of it. I recommend going across one of the street it sits on to get a better vantage point of the whole tower.
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