Joods Historisch Museum

Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Joods Historisch Museum (Jewish Historical Museum) is dedicated to Jewish history, culture and religion, in the Netherlands and worldwide. The Joods Historisch Museum opened its doors in 1932 and was inititally housed at the Waag (Weighing House) on Nieuwmarkt square. Following the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands in World War II, the museum was forced to close and much of the collection was lost. The museum reopened its doors in 1955. In 1987, it moved to a new location, occupying four former synagogues on Jonas Daniël Meijerplein square, across the road from the Snoge or Portuguese Synagogue.

The museum's collection includes some 11,000 art objects, ceremonial objects and historical objects, only some five percent of which is on display at any one time. It has two permanent exhibitions as well as regularly changing temporary exhibitions. The exhibition on the ground floor focuses on Jewish traditions and customs. The presentation is inspired by the former interior of the synagogue. Ceremonial objects from the museum collection are shown in locations where they used to be placed in the synagogue. This gives visitors a sense of the surroundings in which they find themselves and enables them to taste the original synagogue atmosphere.

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Details

Founded: 1932
Category: Museums in Netherlands

More Information

www.jhm.nl
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ruta J (6 months ago)
I had a good experience visiting the Jewish Historical museum. Recommend it to everyone who is interested in history and culture. Also, the museum workers were very nice and helpful. :)
Mark Feldman (10 months ago)
Well done. Interesting and well laid out. Well worth a visit.
sara agostinho (11 months ago)
Nice place to go with children, to learn more about the Jewish history and religion.
Reemanos S (12 months ago)
Beautifully set up museum with a lot of history on religion, art and culture
Artem Ptushkin (16 months ago)
Good place to visit and get Jewish history to know. Temporary exhibitions are quite interesting also. English and Dutch audio guides are available and administrative provide you with headset if needed.
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