Joods Historisch Museum

Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Joods Historisch Museum (Jewish Historical Museum) is dedicated to Jewish history, culture and religion, in the Netherlands and worldwide. The Joods Historisch Museum opened its doors in 1932 and was inititally housed at the Waag (Weighing House) on Nieuwmarkt square. Following the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands in World War II, the museum was forced to close and much of the collection was lost. The museum reopened its doors in 1955. In 1987, it moved to a new location, occupying four former synagogues on Jonas Daniël Meijerplein square, across the road from the Snoge or Portuguese Synagogue.

The museum's collection includes some 11,000 art objects, ceremonial objects and historical objects, only some five percent of which is on display at any one time. It has two permanent exhibitions as well as regularly changing temporary exhibitions. The exhibition on the ground floor focuses on Jewish traditions and customs. The presentation is inspired by the former interior of the synagogue. Ceremonial objects from the museum collection are shown in locations where they used to be placed in the synagogue. This gives visitors a sense of the surroundings in which they find themselves and enables them to taste the original synagogue atmosphere.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1932
Category: Museums in Netherlands

More Information

www.jhm.nl
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

A Google User (21 months ago)
I am glad we went here. It would not normally be on our list but my daughter insisted. We all enjoyed it very much, and we had two young teenagers.
A Google User (2 years ago)
This museum was not interesting for us and also some part of it were close sue to reconstruction. If you are not interested in history, this is definitely worth visiting while in Amsterdam. All the presented topic here are gloomy. The entry price is reasonable and you can visit 4 extra related place with that price which were not crowded so you could view the exhibits at your leisure.
A Google User (2 years ago)
Well worth a visit though you will need to spend several hours of reading various exhibits to get the most out of this place. Reasonably expensive but the tickets dis allow us to see other attractions that we did not have time to visit during our short stay. Educational and informative. The staff are very helpful.
A Google User (2 years ago)
The cost of a ticket gives access to four 'attractions' within the city's Jewish quarter, which in itself is very reasonable. This museum was very insightful, provided lots of information, quite interactive and educational for visitors keen to learn about the religion, and the people's history in Amsterdam and the rest of the country. We thoroughly enjoyed it, thank you.
A Google User (2 years ago)
Having visited several museums in Amsterdam, this is not amongst the top 3. The best feature is that part of the exhibit is inside an actual synagogue. The history of the Jews in Amsterdam is explained in two blocks: from 1600 to 1900, and from 1900 onwards, with references to the Holocaust. The museum looks a bit old fashioned, would need some make over to make it more modern.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.