Moses and Aaron Church

Amsterdam, Netherlands

In the first centuries after the Reformation, the public display of Roman Catholic services and accessories was not tolerated – officially forbidden in 1660 – in Amsterdam. So in 1641 the Franciscans opened a house church, the second of its kind in the city, at a house called the 'Moyses' (Moses), at the back of the present church. In 1682, the house was joined by the neighboring house 'Aäron' (Aaron) with the purchase by Dr. Johannes de Vroom, a physician from Breda.

The present building was built between 1837 and 1841 from a design by Tilman-François Suys (1783-1861) in the style of neoclassicism, with three aisles and a recessed rectangular choir. The facade, with its twin towers, was said to be inspired by the Church of Saint-Sulpice in Paris and Santissima Trinità dei Monti in Rome.

The baroque altar, dating from about 1700, came from the original church with a painting 'The Resurrection of Jesus' by Jacob de Wit (1695–1754). On the walls are the reliefs of the fourteen Stations of the Cross, made by a Flemish sculptor, Petrus Elysens van den Bossche (1841–1921).

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Details

Founded: 1837-1841
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hermes van Amstel (21 months ago)
Somewhat stern looking church, now in use as an event venue. Easy to reach by metro stop Waterloopplein.
Ga Lammers (2 years ago)
Great place to listen and say a prayer
John Adamowski (2 years ago)
Easy to find, difficult to photograph.
Wian Louwrens (2 years ago)
Serene and majestic. Live organ show was interesting.
Rogeh Hanna (2 years ago)
It's a nice church where you feel peace
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