The Schreierstoren, originally part of the medieval city wall of Amsterdam, was built in the 15th century. It was the location from which Henry Hudson set sail on his journey to Northern America. This expedition would lead to the discovery of the island of Manhattan among others. It was built as a defense tower in 1481. It is currently a café.

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Founded: 1481
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christy Shaffer (12 months ago)
The perfect combination. Wonderful selection of nautical books with a first class coffee shop on the first floor.
Christo (2 years ago)
Came for a work Christmas Dinner and the staff were very accommodating of me being vegan, and they were very tolerable of some of our more 'drunk' or rude attendees. Nice group of girls. Good place.
Chuck Wendling (2 years ago)
This is a GREAT place! You can do everything from just having a cup of coffee to holding an unforgettable event!
Fanni Karolina Tóth (2 years ago)
Good beer, good food, you can sit on the terrace or inside. A good stop for a lovely meal before you get on a train to go somewhere from Amsterdam Centraal. The only downside is the shaky railing of the spiral stairs that lead to the restrooms two floors below "food level."
Vladimir Balaz (2 years ago)
This is a very nice cafe / pub near central station. The great views is the key asset of the pub. The pub has three nice lounges and two outdoor terraces. You can admire canals, brick building, but also modern architecture of the Nemo Science museum. We enjoyed good coffee, beer and liquor. We also liked nice and attentive waitresses.
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