Maus Castle construction was begun in 1356 by Archbishop-Elector of Trier Bohemond II and was continued for the next 30 years by successive Electors of Trier. The construction of Burg Maus was to enforce Trier's recently acquired Rhine River toll rights and to secure Trier's borders against the Counts of Katzenelnbogen (who had built Burg Katz and Burg Rheinfels). In the latter half of the 14th century Burg Maus was one of the residences of the Elector of Trier.

Unlike its two neighbouring castles, Burg Maus was never destroyed, though it fell into disrepair in the 16th and 17th centuries. Restoration of the castle was undertaken between 1900 and 1906 under the architect Wilhelm Gärtner with attention to historical detail.

The castle suffered further damage from shelling during World War II which has since been repaired. Today Burg Maus hosts an aviary that is home to falcons, owls and eagles, and flight demonstrations are staged for visitors from late March to early October.

The ward of the castles contains two residential buildings. The vulnerable side facing uphill is guarded by a round bergfried.

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Details

Founded: 1356
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brokk Nevels (3 years ago)
A very interesting Burg steeped with history
Barbara Lui (3 years ago)
Very nice and beautiful
Kushad Ulje (4 years ago)
Photogenic castle which makes for nice pictures from the surrounding hills. Shame though that it isn't open to the public on a regular basis. A poster on the closed gate advertised guided tours with wine tastings, but only around once a month.
piefken Hans Wurst (5 years ago)
They have an absolut fantastic raptor bird show at the castle now..it was incredible to see the show..on top the guys there are very frindly and they have time enough for questions and answer after the show. If you are around I recommend to visjt this place
Cheng-Wei Wu (5 years ago)
Burg Maus (Mouse castle), When there is a mouse, there is a cat - check it out the Burg Katz on the same side of Rhine river just a bit south across St Goar.
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Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

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