Maus Castle construction was begun in 1356 by Archbishop-Elector of Trier Bohemond II and was continued for the next 30 years by successive Electors of Trier. The construction of Burg Maus was to enforce Trier's recently acquired Rhine River toll rights and to secure Trier's borders against the Counts of Katzenelnbogen (who had built Burg Katz and Burg Rheinfels). In the latter half of the 14th century Burg Maus was one of the residences of the Elector of Trier.

Unlike its two neighbouring castles, Burg Maus was never destroyed, though it fell into disrepair in the 16th and 17th centuries. Restoration of the castle was undertaken between 1900 and 1906 under the architect Wilhelm Gärtner with attention to historical detail.

The castle suffered further damage from shelling during World War II which has since been repaired. Today Burg Maus hosts an aviary that is home to falcons, owls and eagles, and flight demonstrations are staged for visitors from late March to early October.

The ward of the castles contains two residential buildings. The vulnerable side facing uphill is guarded by a round bergfried.

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Details

Founded: 1356
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brokk Nevels (2 years ago)
A very interesting Burg steeped with history
Barbara Lui (2 years ago)
Very nice and beautiful
Kushad Ulje (3 years ago)
Photogenic castle which makes for nice pictures from the surrounding hills. Shame though that it isn't open to the public on a regular basis. A poster on the closed gate advertised guided tours with wine tastings, but only around once a month.
piefken Hans Wurst (4 years ago)
They have an absolut fantastic raptor bird show at the castle now..it was incredible to see the show..on top the guys there are very frindly and they have time enough for questions and answer after the show. If you are around I recommend to visjt this place
Cheng-Wei Wu (4 years ago)
Burg Maus (Mouse castle), When there is a mouse, there is a cat - check it out the Burg Katz on the same side of Rhine river just a bit south across St Goar.
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