Once situated directly on the banks of the Rhine, Brömserburg Castle was owned by the Archbishops of Mainz from the beginning of the 10th to the beginning of the 19th century. During the 12th century they converted the old fortress into a castle residence. With its vaulted ceilings and walls of more than two metres thick, it successfully provided resistance against any attack. One exception was the destruction of the castle’s southeastern part, which was destroyed in 1640 by the Duke of Longueville. The castle was inhabited up until 1937, before be- ing acquired by Rüdesheim’s town council in 1941. Today, the castle houses the extensive collections of Rheingau’s wine museum.

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Details

Founded: c. 1000 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joshua Locke (8 months ago)
My wife and I went hoping to see the museum and the interior of the castle; We were only able to walk around the outside as the museum was closed mid-day on a Friday. Maybe the proprietor had gone to lunch or something. Regardless, the grounds were pleasant, it was quiet and there were some old wine making apparatuses and the castle exterior to take pictures of. Spent about 10 minutes there; Wasn't really worth the walk, wish it had been open.
Chewabakka Wookee (11 months ago)
Big choice of wine, good system of tasting, very nice cafe
steve rudis (2 years ago)
Small museum that highlights wine making in the area. More about storage than winemaking. It is fun to wander and look at glasses bottles and other items. Great views as well. This is a wine city
Jessica T (2 years ago)
The wine museum is housed in an old castle. The self guided tour with audio set is good and available in many languages. The building is very cool. Most of the museum is easy to walk through with stairs, but near the end you can go up to the roof of the castle if you take a long, narrow staircase with low clearance. If you can make it, the view is worth it.
Jens Thomas (2 years ago)
We didn't go in but visited the free outside exhibits. A nice selection of various vintages of wine presses. The setting in the vineyards and the old castle was fantastic.
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