In the 12th century, a fortress was located at Breda. The city of Breda came into existence near the fortress. In 1350, the Duke of Brabant sold Breda to Jan II of Polanen (Baron of Breda). He reinforced the castle with four towers and a channel. His daughter Johanna of Polanen married in 1403 the German Duke Engelbert I of Nassau. Their son Jan IV of Nassau enlarged the castle.

Henry III of Nassau-Breda changed the castle into a Renaissance palace in 1536. He died in 1538 and his son René of Châlon finished the castle and built a chapel in 1540. René of Châlon died without any children and the castle became property of his German cousin, William I of Orange, during his battle with the Spanish, it had a military function again (Dutch revolt).

In 1667 the Treaty of Breda was signed by England, France and the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands. This ended the second English-Dutch war. Stadtholder - King William III of England rebuilt the castle between 1686 and 1695. But he and his successors did not stay much at the castle.

In the France time (18th century), the castle was a military barracks and military hospital. Between 1746 and 1748 it was the site of the Breda Peace Talks between Britain and France during the War of the Austrian Succession. The talks formed the foundation for the eventual peace settlement at Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle.

William I of the Netherlands placed at disposal of the Royal Military Academy in 1826. In this time, Thomas Vincidor built three wings and later William II built the fourth wing. The entrance gate is from the 16th century. Today Breda castle is used by Koninklijke Militaire Academie, the service academy for the Dutch Army and the Dutch Air Force.

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Kaatsbaan 81, Breda, Netherlands
See all sites in Breda

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Abdullah obid (2 months ago)
A beautiful castle in the center of Breda.
Reviewer (2 years ago)
Very interesting and unique building with a mote around it too! Very old-world look and feel even in this day and age
Riccardo Scalas (2 years ago)
Castle of Breda; however its the fully functional Military Academy of the NL armed forces. Restricted area therefore.
Robby van den Heuvel (2 years ago)
Fantastic historic castle and a renesance Palace.
tushita sarkar (2 years ago)
Always a photogenic place in all weathers..great place for a day out!
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Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

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