In the 12th century, a fortress was located at Breda. The city of Breda came into existence near the fortress. In 1350, the Duke of Brabant sold Breda to Jan II of Polanen (Baron of Breda). He reinforced the castle with four towers and a channel. His daughter Johanna of Polanen married in 1403 the German Duke Engelbert I of Nassau. Their son Jan IV of Nassau enlarged the castle.

Henry III of Nassau-Breda changed the castle into a Renaissance palace in 1536. He died in 1538 and his son René of Châlon finished the castle and built a chapel in 1540. René of Châlon died without any children and the castle became property of his German cousin, William I of Orange, during his battle with the Spanish, it had a military function again (Dutch revolt).

In 1667 the Treaty of Breda was signed by England, France and the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands. This ended the second English-Dutch war. Stadtholder - King William III of England rebuilt the castle between 1686 and 1695. But he and his successors did not stay much at the castle.

In the France time (18th century), the castle was a military barracks and military hospital. Between 1746 and 1748 it was the site of the Breda Peace Talks between Britain and France during the War of the Austrian Succession. The talks formed the foundation for the eventual peace settlement at Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle.

William I of the Netherlands placed at disposal of the Royal Military Academy in 1826. In this time, Thomas Vincidor built three wings and later William II built the fourth wing. The entrance gate is from the 16th century. Today Breda castle is used by Koninklijke Militaire Academie, the service academy for the Dutch Army and the Dutch Air Force.

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Address

Kaatsbaan 81, Breda, Netherlands
See all sites in Breda

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tushita sarkar (12 months ago)
Always a photogenic place in all weathers..great place for a day out!
Kim Blok (2 years ago)
Very nice castle to visit, we were there during monument weekend, further else the museum is limited accessible. I cannot find openinghours anywhere online. The historical grounds, buildings and art are very well preserved. The old tunnels are stunning! There is a historical collection / museum which has limited opening hours, when we were there it was closed unfortunately. I cannot find the opening hours on their website, it has a nice overview of the collection but not of the opening hours.
Joep De Waard (2 years ago)
Ja yolo mega cool
Sunil Poshala (2 years ago)
nice park and beautiful ambience..relaxing
Bart van Eijl (2 years ago)
Only open once a year this is an old castle owned by Breda military academy. We visited knights in full plate armour on horses mimicking a Lance fight. Lances were breaking. Also nice paintings of kings and queens inside a building.
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