Trier Imperial Baths

Trier, Germany

The Trier Imperial Baths (Kaiserthermen) are a large Roman bath complex, designated as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. The impressive ruins of the baths, along with the derelict rooms and the walls of previous structures, are among the most important to have been discovered in Trier. Today a visit to the thermal baths, which can also be explored below ground, is like stepping back in time. The walls of the hot bath (caldarium) are deservedly part of this famous landmark in Trier. After the one in Rome, the Imperial Thermal Baths and St. Barbara Roman Baths were once among the largest bathing complexes in the Roman empire. They were built in the first and second centuries AD.

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Address

Kaiserstraße, Trier, Germany
See all sites in Trier

Details

Founded: 0-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jason Boynton (2 years ago)
Wonderful place to visit. It will only improve as more is uncovered at this site!
seif dawood (2 years ago)
Nice place. But it would be great if there are tour guides around that can explain more about the Roman’s history and their life style, so that full imagination of the past era could be clearly revealed.
Koeka (2 years ago)
Just a WOW moment coming here... easily rivals any ruins you'd find in Rome..you're able to walk the grounds AND have access to the vast underground walkways... and clean bathroom to boot!
Ruthmary Weinger (2 years ago)
This place of antiquity is one that helps us understand cultures hundreds of years old. I was here many years ago and am so impressed with the work that has gone on since then. My only disappointment is that I would have liked more description in English. There's so much to learn there.
Patricia Alexander (2 years ago)
I really enjoyed this exhibit. The slight expense was totally worth it! The information was posted in German and English. It was all very interesting, including the tower that was built recently to get an overall view of the baths. Definitely worth a visit!
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