Slavín Memorial Monument

Bratislava, Slovakia

Slavín is a memorial monument and military cemetery in Bratislava. It is the burial ground of 6,845 Soviet Army soldiers who fell during World War II while liberating the city in April 1945 from the occupying German Wehrmacht units and the remaining Slovak troops who supported the clero-fascist Tiso government. It is situated on a hill amidst a rich villa quarter of the capital and embassy residences close to the centre of Bratislava.

It was constructed between 1957 and 1960 on the site of a field cemetery, and opened on April 3, 1960 on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of the city's liberation. The monument was constructed similar in kind to the Palace of Culture and Science in Stalinist architectural style. In 1961 it was declared a National Cultural Monument. Its designer was Ján Svetlík. On top of the 39.1 metre high pylon stands an 11 metre high sculpture of a soldier by A. Trizuljak. The bronze caisson door of the memorial auditorium is decorated with reliefs by R. Pribiš.

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Details

Founded: 1957-1960
Category: Statues in Slovakia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bill Petras (14 months ago)
Magnificent historical monument. A great reminder of the lives that were sacrificed for the liberation of nations.
Tomek S (15 months ago)
Nice view of the city. Perfect for a bit of a walk on a good day.
Meelis Väljamäe (2 years ago)
Very well preserved memorial site. It's clear that the memorial is being looked after properly, unlike many other WWII memorials. City views from the memorial are amazing.
Cristian Garcia (2 years ago)
I came around 7pm on December. I was by myself and the place was really creepy, it had a weird vibe but the monument was impressive and majestic. The view of the city was also astonishing. Wish I could have been during the day
Azra Ćulov (2 years ago)
My favorite place in Bratislava. I wasn't impressed until I went to Slavín. You can reach it by bus or on foot. I believe it is a great way of commemorating the dead. It is very impressive beautiful, especially the park surrounding the monument.
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