Huis ten Bosch ('House in the Woods') is a royal palace and one of three official residences of the Dutch Royal Family. Construction of Huis ten Bosch began in 1645, under the direction of Bartholomeus Drijffhout, and to a design by Pieter Post and Jacob van Campen. It was commissioned by Amalia von Solms, the wife of stadtholder Frederick Henry, on a parcel of land granted to her by the States General. The first stone was laid by Elizabeth of Bohemia.

After her husband's death in 1647, Amalia dedicated the palace to him. Led by the Catholic architect-painters Jacob van Campen and Pieter Post, other major Catholic artists of the day such as Gerard van Honthorst, Jacob Jordaens, Thomas Willeboirts Bosschaert, Theodoor van Thulden, Caesar van Everdingen, Salomon de Bray, Pieter Soutman, Gonzales Coques, Pieter de Grebber, Adriaen Hanneman and Jan Lievens filled the Oranjezaal ('Orange Hall' ) with paintings glorifying the late prince. The dining room was designed by Daniel Marot.

Over the next century and a half, the palace would change possession from the Nassau family, the king of Prussia, and many stadtholders until the French invaded in 1795. They gave the palace to the Batavian (Dutch) people who still own it to this day.

The National Art Gallery, precessor of the Rijksmuseum, was housed in the building from 1800 to 1805. Napoleon Bonaparte's brother, Louis, king of Holland, briefly lived in the palace between 1805 and 1807.

When William I was proclaimed King of the Netherlands, he made Huis ten Bosch one of his official residences. It became a favourite location for many members of the Royal Family, and during World War I it became the primary residence of Queen Wilhelmina.

The Queen and her family were forced to evacuate the palace for Britain (from which the Queen's family, but not the Queen herself, would move on to Canada) when the German army invaded the Netherlands during World War II. The Nazi administration planned to demolish the palace, but the controller convinced them otherwise. However, the palace was damaged beyond habitation.

Between 1950 and 1956, the palace was restored and once again became a Royal residence. It became the prime residence once more in 1981.

The palace has undergone major reconstructions since it was built. Currently, it consists of a central part with two long wings, spanning approximately 110 m from end to end.

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Details

Founded: 1645
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Kees de Nooijer (14 months ago)
what can i say, under construction for the moment
Geert Wirken (15 months ago)
There is not much to see, the palace is closed to the public. And currently it's being renovated, so even the outside view near the garden entrance in the forest isn't very nice (lots of scaffolding and construction material).
David Boers (3 years ago)
Cute palace, inaccessible to public, beware of paramilitary police guarding this residence of the king.
Johan-Martijn ten Hove (3 years ago)
Visited the Oranjezaal, which was temporarily opened to the public. It was great to see all the wall paintings in the dome-ceiling room. Unfortunately we were not allowed to see the rest of the palace and also taking pictures was forbidden.
Aaron Ciuffo (3 years ago)
Occasionally the painting gallery is open by appointment. Guests can register on line for a tour. The staff is very friendly and very knowledgeable. The tours are primarily given in Dutch. The painting gallery is gorgeous and records the great moments in the Dutch kingdom.
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