The Peace Palace (Vredespaleis) is an administrative building and often called the seat of international law because it houses the International Court of Justice (which is the principal judicial body of the United Nations), the Permanent Court of Arbitration, the Hague Academy of International Law, and the extensive Peace Palace Library. In addition to hosting these institutions, the Palace is also a regular venue for special events in international policy and law. The Palace officially opened on 28 August 1913, and was originally built to provide a symbolic home for the Permanent Court of Arbitration, a court created to end war which was created by treaty at the 1899 Hague Peace Conference.

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Founded: 1913
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Netherlands

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

-- (9 months ago)
A nice short tour through the building. A most beautiful piece of art, architecture. Nice to visit for tourists but also a place to visit for locals and other Dutch. Parking free in the weekends, good to reach by bike or public transport.
Overseer In 't Hout (9 months ago)
Heritage is part of that ancient word linked to beauty. Just wished id had more money so i could build nice things instead of having too hopelessly look at anothers possession... Beautiful nonetheless offcourse however.
Rude Boy (9 months ago)
free entry and audio guide at the visitor center; guided tour 11€ reserved online ONLY. beautifully presented audio guide, modern facilities & exhibits; amazingly & efficiently use of small visitor center.
Sameer Shukla (12 months ago)
Truly very peaceful place The Peace Palace, Hague. The court structure is humongous and picturesque along with vast green lush beautiful garden. Also there are two significant structures; first The Peace tree where people tie peace notes which is an amazing feeling to be able to notice add your own peace note and feel part of world peace and Second a peace memorial fire which has one stone from each country put around it. This is one of a kind experience to be here.
Anthony J (13 months ago)
So beautiful place that represents how the nations are united to keep the peace going on. There is a gratis area that shows you the history since the palace was built and how it became so popular, the staff at the reception give you earphones to listen the history on your own language. Worth visiting.
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