Curiously resembling the Parthenon in Greece, the Eglise de la Madeleine (named after Mary Magdalene) was originally slated to be a government hall, a library, and a National Bank. It was originally built in the 18th century to the site of ancient Jewish synagogue. The Madeleine Church was designed in its present form as a temple to the glory of Napoleon's army in 1806.

The latter eventually got his way, and in 1842 the odd place of worship was consecrated. The facade comprises 52 Corinthian columns supported by a decorative fresco. Inside, a remarkable statue of Joan of Arc is one highlight, as are paintings depicting the marriage of the Virgin and the baptism of the Christ child.

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Founded: 18th century
Category: Religious sites in France

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zoran Lutovac (36 days ago)
Once again thanks to Napoleon,in present day this church was designed in its present form as a temple to the glory of his army.Together with the banks of the Sein river,it is protected under UNESCO.Built in 1807 and completed in 1828.At the beginning it was named by Napoleon 'Temple to the Glory of the Great Army.
Victoria Sartori Acree (49 days ago)
my favorite church in paris. the lesser known big church. check it out. the architecture and inside decor is breathtaking.
Wissam Raji (2 months ago)
Amazing church with great concerts inside. Attended the mass and it was a great experience visiting there.
Beulah J (4 months ago)
I experienced there holy time. The choir sang hymns like angel's praise God. You must go there in your life. Fantastic church!
Dana K (4 months ago)
Striking building & interior decoration. Check out ahead for any concerts that may be played here, it’s a pretty cool experience if you enjoy classical music. The acoustic may not be the best depending on where you are seated, but the ambiance of the church and the music is unbeatable!
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