Moulin Rouge (French for Red Mill) is a cabaret co-founded in 1889 by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller, who also owned the Paris Olympia. Close to Montmartre in the Paris district of Pigalle on Boulevard de Clichy in the 18th arrondissement, it is marked by the red windmill on its roof.

Moulin Rouge is best known as the spiritual birthplace of the modern form of the can-can dance. Originally introduced as a seductive dance by the courtesans who operated from the site, the can-can dance revue evolved into a form of entertainment of its own and led to the introduction of cabarets across Europe. Today, the Moulin Rouge is a tourist attraction, offering musical dance entertainment for visitors from around the world. The club's decor still contains much of the romance of the late 1800s France.

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Founded: 1889
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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Evelyn Thomas (14 months ago)
Love..love..love this place! What an exciting experience, the venue is wonderful, service impeccable, delicious menu and fantastic show! Don't settle for second best, a definite must see show when in Paris. Truly a wonderful, fun night and safe atmosphere. My visit was in 2009 and 2019, I can't wait to see it again!
Akshay Davda (15 months ago)
Moulin Rouge - A cabaret in Paris , has nudity so please check the age limit for their shows before booking. The Overall atmosphere whether it was the act, decor , ambience , food was an experience which was one of a kind. The performance was good, but the food was below par & very expensive Frankly its the experience that you pay for rather than the food. So just enjoy the decor, ambience, cabaret & don't judge it in terms for the money spent .
Kyle Wilkins (15 months ago)
Great show! Beautiful ladies, great dancers
Laura Powers (15 months ago)
This show was amazing. The costumes were of the highest quality and absolutely beautiful. The dancers were very pretty. Very entertaining. The food on the other side was the worse. Very overpriced and tasteless. Now that I know I would not have paid so much for the food option and only do the show. The seating arrangement is very tight too, can barely moved without bumping into others. The show however makes up for the other flaws!!
Michel MRAD (2 years ago)
It is a must-see show. Expensive, yes! Regrets? Not one! It was truly worth every penny! The show is bigger and crazier than you can imagine! We did the champagne only package with the show and had a blast! One of the best eye-opening show in the world. Beautiful and talented dancers and the security and the reception staff are extremely professional with high customer service skills. The show is stunning I will assure you that you will look constantly and be always amazed. The thing that could have been better is the seating arrangement. A group of 6 shares a table and if you are unlucky, you get the back seats and all you can see are heads of the other guests also the seats are so narrow. I understand they are trying to maximize their profit with this table arrangement however the customers need to be comfortable when paying an expensive ticket for such shows.
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