Kiiu Tower

Kiiu, Estonia

Kiiu vassal stronghold, i.e. Kiiu Tower, is located in Kiiu Manor Park. It was erected in 1517 by Baron von Tiesenhausen and it is the smallest stronghold building in Estonia. There are four floors in the tower and from outside the stone wall is surrounded by a wooden circular balcony. The thickness of walls at the foot is 1.8 metres; the inner diameter is 4.3 metres.

The stronghold was destroyed during the Livonian War and it was restored under the leadership of art historian Villem Raam in 1974. Today a café is open in the citadel.

Reference: VisitEstonia

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Address

Kuusalu E20, Kiiu, Estonia
See all sites in Kiiu

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kusti Zhao (3 years ago)
Closed earlier before the scheduled closing time.
Ave Kusmin (3 years ago)
Exciting attraction
Yerlan Akhmetov (3 years ago)
Old tower of Kiiu town. This building was used as a protection tower from invaders in 16th century.
Anton Paitsev (3 years ago)
Алексей Жиров (6 years ago)
Great place to visit and make coffee break. Very tasty homemade pies. Cute owner what told you a history of the tower.
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