St. Lawrence Church

Kuusalu, Estonia

The Church of St. Lawrence in Kuusalu is considered to be one of the oldest stone churches in Northern Europe. It may have been built originally by the Gotlandish Cistercian monks of the priory of a Roma monastery locating in Kolga. The church was built probably at the end of the 13th century.

The Baroque-style bell tower was erected in 1760. The Neo-Gothic shape of the church originates from the large renovation made in 1890.

There are many historically valuable artefacts in the church like the pulpit, altar, tower clock, chandelier, candle holders and an embossed brass bracket from the 17th century and Eucharistic vessels made of tin.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.visitestonia.com

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