The medieval stone church of Ambla is the oldest in Central Estonia. Construction of the church was started in the mid-13th century. The church has been consecrated in the name of Virgin Mary, the main patron saint of Teutonic Order. In Latin the church is called Ampla Maria (Mary the Majestic), which also has given the name for the village.

The Renaissance-style interior was mainly destroyed in Livonian Wars, but there still exist an altarpiece and pulpit made in the 17th century.

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Address

Valguse tee 2, Ambla Parish, Estonia
See all sites in Ambla Parish

Details

Founded: ca. 1250
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.ambla.ee

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