Purdi manor (Noistfer) has a history that goes back to at least 1560. The current building is a baroque manor house, built in circa 1760-1770 by the von Baranoff family. Some baroque interiors still survive. Additions to the building were made in the 19th century. Several annexes belonging to the estate are still preserved, notably the granary, as well as the baroque burial chapel of the Ungern-Sternberg family, who were the last feudal landlords of the estate.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Anna-Purdi, Purdi, Estonia
See all sites in Purdi

Details

Founded: 1760-1770
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MAD DROPS (2 years ago)
Norm aga ehitatakse kaua
Marko Tammiku (2 years ago)
Väga meeldiv koht
Janno Jõearu (2 years ago)
Mõnus rahulik koht kus pikniku pidada
Peeter Raal (2 years ago)
Minu vanaisa Hugo Raal oli Purdis proviisor(apteeker)
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Purdi , Paide vald, Järvamaa 58.994646, 25.620578 ‎58° 59' 40.73", 25° 37' 14.08" Современный предшественник мызы Пурди, находился в Оятагузе, в трёх километрах от центральной части мызы на запад. Здесь находилась мыза ордена, которая сначала принадлежала Таллинну, позже пайдескому городскому фогту. Во время ливонской войны, 7 июня 1560 года, русские войска подожгли мызу Оятагузе и она сгорела до тла. В послевоенное время, эти земли перешли во владение к Буртам, которые построили новый господский дом на месте старого. Немецкое название мызы Нойсфер, стали использовать в качестве исторического названия местности. Эстонское название Пурди происходит от фамилии одних из владельцев мызы. В 17 веке, Бурты построили каменный господский дом, который, предположительно, был разрушен в годы Северной войны, когда совершались грабительские набеги на всю эту территорию. В 18 веке, мыза перешла во владение к дворянской семье Бараноффа. В 1760-70 годах Бараноффы построили одноэтажный каменный господский дом в стиле барокко, который сохранился до наших дней. Построенный в то время господский дом имел щипковую крышу, а также невысокие пристройки. Центральная часть здания датируется 17 веком. Неподалёку от господского дома находится ряд хозяйственных построек 18 века – амбар, конюшня, экипажная, дом управляющего и дом для прислуги – часть из них сохранилась, от некоторых остались лишь развалины. Из мызы к церкви Анна ведёт 2-километровая аллея. До 2000 года на мызе функционировала школа, на сегодняшний день, мыза находится в частном владении. В юго-западном направлении, на расстоянии 1,5 км, неподалёку от дороги, ведущей к церкви Анна, находится часовня с волютной крышей.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.