The Bergkirche was built in the early 18th century by Prince Paul Esterházy. Eisenstadt was the seat of the Esterházy family, and the church lies just short walk to the west of the family's main palace.

The Bergkirche is architecturally quite unusual and is built in two parts. The main section, the church proper, is approximately a square. The interior is in Baroque style. The ceiling takes the form of a dome, which was painted in fresco in the late 18th century.

A side chapel is dominated by a large marble sarcophagus, the tomb of the composer Joseph Haydn, who spent much of his career in Eisenstadt working for the Esterházys. The remains of most of Haydn's body have rested here since 1932; the skull was added (with due pomp and ceremony) only in 1954; for the reason for the disparity see Haydn's head.

The church still possesses its original organ, built in the 18th century by the Viennese maker Gottfried Malleck; the instrument has been restored to its original state, as it was when it was played by Haydn and Beethoven at the premieres of famous works. The original console, however, is no longer used but resides now in the nearby Haydn Museum.

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Founded: 1715
Category: Religious sites in Austria

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alireza Saebi (2 years ago)
A very beautiful Kirche, recommend to see outside and inside completely.
Lize Grimbeek (3 years ago)
Stunning, worth the visit
Patrik H H (3 years ago)
A beautiful place and important because of Joseph Haydns mausoleum
Leopold David Zöserl (3 years ago)
Die römisch-katholische Bergkirche Eisenstadt (auch als Haydnkirche oder Kalvarienbergkirche bekannt) steht im Stadtteil Oberberg-Eisenstadt der Gemeinde Eisenstadt im Burgenland. Sie ist dem Fest Mariä Heimsuchung geweiht und gehört zum Dekanat Eisenstadt in der Diözese Eisenstadt. Das Bauwerk steht unter Denkmalschutz.
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