Bergkirche

Eisenstadt, Austria

The Bergkirche was built in the early 18th century by Prince Paul Esterházy. Eisenstadt was the seat of the Esterházy family, and the church lies just short walk to the west of the family's main palace.

The Bergkirche is architecturally quite unusual and is built in two parts. The main section, the church proper, is approximately a square. The interior is in Baroque style. The ceiling takes the form of a dome, which was painted in fresco in the late 18th century.

A side chapel is dominated by a large marble sarcophagus, the tomb of the composer Joseph Haydn, who spent much of his career in Eisenstadt working for the Esterházys. The remains of most of Haydn's body have rested here since 1932; the skull was added (with due pomp and ceremony) only in 1954; for the reason for the disparity see Haydn's head.

The church still possesses its original organ, built in the 18th century by the Viennese maker Gottfried Malleck; the instrument has been restored to its original state, as it was when it was played by Haydn and Beethoven at the premieres of famous works. The original console, however, is no longer used but resides now in the nearby Haydn Museum.

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Founded: 1715
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Namhee Joo (10 months ago)
So grateful that I found this church in my life. To understand Esterhazy and Haydn, this Bergkirche presents time and authenticity itself
Levente Jancso (2 years ago)
Haydn's mausoleum is also located here.
Heiliger Satyr (2 years ago)
Resting place of Haydn and his two skulls. And very curious Kalvarienberg (a set of baroque sculptures representing the stations of the cross, dislocated on various levels.
Wesley Wei (3 years ago)
Haydnkirche is a very cool place to visit, great architecture and design!
Alireza Saebi (4 years ago)
A very beautiful Kirche, recommend to see outside and inside completely.
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