Church of St. Anne

Kraków, Poland

The Church of St. Anne is one of the leading examples of Polish Baroque architecture. The church was first mentioned in 1381 in the deed of donation of Sulisław I Nawoja of Grodziec. In 1407 the church was completely destroyed during a fire, but it was rebuilt the same year in the Gothic style by King Władysław II Jagiełło. The king also attached the Church formally to the Jagiellonian University by giving it the right to nominate the parish priest. In 1428 the choir was reconstructed and enlarged. By a charter dated October 27, 1535 St. Anne's was raised to the rank of a collegiate church.

In 1689 the Gothic edifice was demolished as it proved too small for the growing cult of Saint John Cantius, the patron saint of the Jagiellonian University who's laid to rest there. In 1689-1705 the new Baroque church was erected, modelled on Sant'Andrea della Valle in Rome. The architect was a Polonized Dutchman Tylman van Gameren, a chief architect at the court of John III Sobieski. The interior stucco decoration is the work of Baldassare Fontana, and the polychromy assisted by painters and brothers Carlo and Innocente Monti and Karl Dankwart of Nysa. The painting of St. Anne in the high altar is the work of Jerzy Siemiginowski-Eleuter, court painter of King John III Sobieski. The 18th-century paintings in the stalls showing the life of Saint Anne are by Szymon Czechowicz. In the transept there is an altar of the adoration of the cross to the left, and the tomb of John Cantius to the right.

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Founded: 1689-1705
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Doherty (2 years ago)
The name of one of Jesus Grandmother's, Mary's Mother, and a lovely Church.
Franek Peplinski (2 years ago)
Beautiful church. Worth a short detour.
Mmc Yyu (3 years ago)
From wiki The architect was a Polonized Dutchman Tylman van Gameren, a chief architect at the court of John III Sobieski. The interior stucco decoration is the work of Baldassarre Fontana, and the polychromy assisted by painters and brothers Carlo and Innocente Monti and Karl Dankwart of Nysa. The painting of St. Anne in the high altar is the work of Jerzy Siemiginowski-Eleuter, court painter of King John III Sobieski. The 18th-century paintings in the stalls showing the life of Saint Anne are by Szymon Czechowicz. In the transept there is an altar of the adoration of the cross to the left, and the tomb of John Cantius to the right.
Ramunė Vaičiulytė (3 years ago)
One of the leading examples of Polish Baroque architecture. The church's history dates back to 14th century when it was Gothic style, but after fire it was rebuilt. Now the largest Baroque church in Krakow, airy dome frescoes and soft angels everywhere offer a sense of light and redemption, and the fine stucco decoration by the Italian artist Baldassare Fontana is especially noteworthy.
Matthew Lane (3 years ago)
This astounding church has a much lighter feel than some of the others, with lighter paintings throughout the domes. Look especially at the plaster work, which often creeps outside the borders of where the image is supposed to be, making the scenes feel like they're approaching you in 3D.
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