Warsaw National Museum

Warsaw, Poland

The National Museum in Warsaw was originally founded in 1862 as the Museum of Fine Arts and is currently one of the oldest art museums in the country. After Poland regained its independence in 1918, the National Museum was ascribed a prominent role in the plans for the new state and its capital city of Warsaw, and the Modernist building in which it currently resides was erected in 1927–1938. Today, the National Museum in Warsaw boasts a collection numbering around 830,000 works of art from Poland and abroad, from ancient times to the present including paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, coins, as well as utilitarian objects and design.

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Details

Founded: 1862
Category: Museums in Poland

More Information

www.mnw.art.pl

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Florian Breut (2 years ago)
99% of the museum closed. No indication.
Magdalena Pinkwart (2 years ago)
Fantastic pieces of art. Medieval and Faras exhibitions recommended.
Willem Fütterer (2 years ago)
Only a fraction is opened during corona but they still charge full price. Personell is not very friendly
Andrew Aitken (2 years ago)
I visited pre-coronavirus and it was excellent, we spent hours wandering all the exhibits. Absolutely worth a visit, although be sure to budget more time than planned. Also, visit the restaurant if you get the chance.
Jorge Potti (2 years ago)
What an underrated museum! I spent two only hours looking at the paintings on the right galleries of the first floor and they were wonderful. A bit of history, mythology, landscapes, portraits... I would have never thought that there was an art museum in Poland this good (no offense of course) and I'll definitely have to come back to see the rest of it
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