Warsaw National Museum

Warsaw, Poland

The National Museum in Warsaw was originally founded in 1862 as the Museum of Fine Arts and is currently one of the oldest art museums in the country. After Poland regained its independence in 1918, the National Museum was ascribed a prominent role in the plans for the new state and its capital city of Warsaw, and the Modernist building in which it currently resides was erected in 1927–1938. Today, the National Museum in Warsaw boasts a collection numbering around 830,000 works of art from Poland and abroad, from ancient times to the present including paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, coins, as well as utilitarian objects and design.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1862
Category: Museums in Poland

More Information

www.mnw.art.pl

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Florian Breut (11 months ago)
99% of the museum closed. No indication.
Magdalena Pinkwart (11 months ago)
Fantastic pieces of art. Medieval and Faras exhibitions recommended.
Willem Fütterer (11 months ago)
Only a fraction is opened during corona but they still charge full price. Personell is not very friendly
Andrew Aitken (12 months ago)
I visited pre-coronavirus and it was excellent, we spent hours wandering all the exhibits. Absolutely worth a visit, although be sure to budget more time than planned. Also, visit the restaurant if you get the chance.
Jorge Potti (13 months ago)
What an underrated museum! I spent two only hours looking at the paintings on the right galleries of the first floor and they were wonderful. A bit of history, mythology, landscapes, portraits... I would have never thought that there was an art museum in Poland this good (no offense of course) and I'll definitely have to come back to see the rest of it
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.