Fort Legionow

Warsaw, Poland

Fort Legionow was built between 1852 and 1854 on the southern foreland of the Warsaw Citadel. Initially, the fort had the shape of a three-storey artillery turret, surrounded by a fortified ditch with three cofferdams and a gallery in the counterscarp. Its task was to guard the citadel from the side of the New Town and also to defend the seasonal bridge over the Vistula River.

In the years between 1866 and 1874 the fort was modernized. A battery emplacement in the shape of the letter “L” was built between the bastion and the River Vistula, equipped with two emergency brick shelters and also a brick battery which was meant to control the Vistula River bed. The fort survived during the Warsaw Uprising despite the ongoing fierce fighting over the Polish Security Printing Works and after 1945 it was used by the military.

Since 1999, the fort has been privately owned by a well-known family of Warsaw restaurateurs, Agnieszka and Marcin Kreglicki. Three buildings have survived in Warsaw arranged around the Citadel. Fort Legionow is the only structure in the Warsaw Citadel of a “mountainous” nature, with a complex underground system.

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Address

Zakroczymska 12, Warsaw, Poland
See all sites in Warsaw

Details

Founded: 1852
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

www.poland.travel

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Garel Martorosian (10 months ago)
amazing place
Jacek Kamieniecki (11 months ago)
Nice place for big party
Maciej Kołodziejczyk (11 months ago)
We had organized a party for 3rd classes of secondary school here, the atmosphere was amazing, food was delicious, vost was reasonable. In short it's a great place for organizing big parties and meetings. Totally recommended.
Rob (15 months ago)
on the edge of the re-built town center. scenic!
W RR (16 months ago)
Tried and true event venue near Old town and Vistula
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