Koeru Church is one of the oldest medieval churches in Järvamaa with a beautiful Baroque tower. The church was built probably in the mid-13th century and expanded to the three-nave form aroud 1300.

The church was damaged badly in Livonian Wars and again in Great Northern War. It was mainly reconstructed in 1721. The present 43m high tower was built in the end of 18th century. The pulpit, altarpiece and crucifix in the church date from the 17th century.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1250
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.jarva.ee

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User Reviews

Merle Urbanus (2 years ago)
Kaisa Samuilov (2 years ago)
Väljast näeb suht maha jäetud kiriku moodi välja
Andrus Jaanimägi (2 years ago)
Kahjuks oli suletud
Anders Põld (4 years ago)
Oli väga meeldiv kogemus
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Koeru alevik, Väinjärve tee 1a Järvamaa, 58.964063, 26.030356 ‎58° 57' 50.63", 26° 1' 49.28" Церковь Марии Магдалена в Коэру была предположительно основана Таллиннским епископом Торкилем в 1253 году. Церковь отличается интересной ахитектурой. Ее своды опираются здесь на две пары круглых стройных столбов. Травеи среднего нефа квадратные, почти вдвое шире травей боковых нефов. Восточное окно хора сохранило первоначальную форму с внутренней стороны — верхняя часть образована из двух трехлопастных частей с завершением из трилистника. Лопасти имеют слегка стрельчатую, то есть готическую, форму. Башня церкви в Коэру построена не одновременно с нефами. Ее стены не имеют перевязи со стеной нефа. На то, что башня построена позже, указывает и лестница в толще восточной стены. Известно, что устройство такой лестницы обычно при отсутствии башни. Как пристроенная к северному фасаду паперть, так и сакристия являются тоже поздними пристройками. Интерьер церкви очень интересен - в нем присутствуют рельефные мотивы фигур монахов, волков, обезьян. В церкви присутсвует настенная средневековая живопись. Орган церкви был установлен в 1990 году.
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