Koeru Church is one of the oldest medieval churches in Järvamaa with a beautiful Baroque tower. The church was built probably in the mid-13th century and expanded to the three-nave form aroud 1300.

The church was damaged badly in Livonian Wars and again in Great Northern War. It was mainly reconstructed in 1721. The present 43m high tower was built in the end of 18th century. The pulpit, altarpiece and crucifix in the church date from the 17th century.

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Founded: ca. 1250
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.jarva.ee

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Merle Urbanus (3 years ago)
Kaisa Samuilov (3 years ago)
Väljast näeb suht maha jäetud kiriku moodi välja
Andrus Jaanimägi (3 years ago)
Kahjuks oli suletud
Anders Põld (5 years ago)
Oli väga meeldiv kogemus
Anatoly Ko (8 years ago)
Koeru alevik, Väinjärve tee 1a Järvamaa, 58.964063, 26.030356 ‎58° 57' 50.63", 26° 1' 49.28" Церковь Марии Магдалена в Коэру была предположительно основана Таллиннским епископом Торкилем в 1253 году. Церковь отличается интересной ахитектурой. Ее своды опираются здесь на две пары круглых стройных столбов. Травеи среднего нефа квадратные, почти вдвое шире травей боковых нефов. Восточное окно хора сохранило первоначальную форму с внутренней стороны — верхняя часть образована из двух трехлопастных частей с завершением из трилистника. Лопасти имеют слегка стрельчатую, то есть готическую, форму. Башня церкви в Коэру построена не одновременно с нефами. Ее стены не имеют перевязи со стеной нефа. На то, что башня построена позже, указывает и лестница в толще восточной стены. Известно, что устройство такой лестницы обычно при отсутствии башни. Как пристроенная к северному фасаду паперть, так и сакристия являются тоже поздними пристройками. Интерьер церкви очень интересен - в нем присутствуют рельефные мотивы фигур монахов, волков, обезьян. В церкви присутсвует настенная средневековая живопись. Орган церкви был установлен в 1990 году.
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Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.