Hohenurach Castle Ruins

Bad Urach, Germany

The first documented record of Hohenurach Castle dates from 1235, but it was probably built in the 11th century by the Counts of Urach. Count Ludwig I of Württemberg updated the castle in 1427, building a new castle on the existing foundations. Following heavy damage in 1547 during the Schmalkaldic War, Duke Christoph of Württemberg had the castle rebuilt in 1551. From the 16th century onwards, the castle complex also served as a state jail, whose inmates included the Tübingen Professor Nicodemus Frischlin (1547-1590).

As a military facility Hohenurach Fortress also posed a constant threat to the citizens of the nearby town. It wasn't until 1765, however, that Duke Carl Eugen of Württemberg decided to move his soldiers to the town and had Hohenurach Fortress torn down. All that remains of the castle site is a towering ruin – one of the biggest, mightiest and most important ruins in southern Germany.

The castle ruins are free to explore, but can only be accessed on foot.

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Bad Urach, Germany
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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.stuttgart-tourist.de

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Flavius Razvan (12 months ago)
Very beautiful place it's worth visiting
Bhupathi Kanakamamidi (16 months ago)
Nice view from top of the castle. But not so special about this place
Ishai Rosenbaum (2 years ago)
If you are in the area, it's worth a visit!
Niklas Klosa (2 years ago)
Nice Castle
Niklas Klosa (2 years ago)
Nice Castle
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