The Goloring is an ancient earthworks monument located near Koblenz. It was created in the Bronze Age era, which dates back to the Urnfield culture (1200–800 BC). During this time a widespread solar cult is believed to have existed in Central Europe.

The Goloring consists of a circular ditch of 175 metres in diameter with an outside embankment extending to 190 metres. Technically this makes the structure a henge monument, although the use of the term henge outside of Britain is sometimes disputed. The outside embankment is approx. 7 metres wide and 80 cm high. The ditch has an upper width of 5–6 metres and is approx. 80 cm deep. In the interior one can find a roughly circular leveled platform, which is about elevated by about 1 metre. The platform has been created based on piled gravelled rock and has a diameter of 95 metres. Remnants of a 50 cm thick wooden post with an estimated height of 8–12 metres were excavated in the middle of this platform.

The design of the ditch is unique in Germany, and makes the earthworks similar to many British monuments of the same era. It is often compared to Stonehenge in England, which has similar diametric proportions.

Goloring is located within the boundaries of a former military dog training camp, but was acquired by the town of Kobern-Gondorf in June 2004. The Goloring is currently not accessible to the general public but there are plans under way to build a historic park with the earthworks at its centre.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

L52, Koblenz, Germany
See all sites in Koblenz

Details

Founded: 1200-800 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Bronze Age (Germany)

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Dötsch (2 years ago)
Sehr schöner Parkplatz. Liegt direkt am Wald. Leider ist der Zugang zum Wald versperrt. Der Parkplatz ist sauber.
Lisa Meier (2 years ago)
Von außen kann man nicht viel sehen (Zaun, teilweise mit Stacheldraht). Die Anlage ist nur im Rahmen einer Führung zu besichtigen. Die Führung war sehr langwierig und trocken vorgetragen, teilweise wurde uns alles doppelt erzählt. Bei dem kurzen Rundgang ca. 600 Meter, ging es erst durch ein kleines Waldstück und dann durchs Gebüsch (zu dem Zeitpunkt als wir da waren, war das Unkraut und Gras sehr hoch), so das man nicht gut laufen konnte. Für uns hat sich die Besichtigung nicht gelohnt.
Clemens Wilhelm (2 years ago)
Leider ist die Anlage nur mit Führung zu besichtigen. Die lohnt sich aber alle Mal. Mit einer interessanten Einführung in die Geschichte der Anlage und den Schwierigkeiten, mit denen die Archäologen zu kämpfen hatten, eine rundum gelungene Veranstaltung. Darüber, wie der zweite Weltkrieg und der Bau der A48 auf der einen Seite vieles zerstört haben, auf der anderen Seite aber dadurch alles genau dokumentiert werden konnte, und die Zerstörung durch den Kies-Abbau, wurde auch informiert. Auch die Bundeswehr, die den Standort nutzte, hat zwar einiges zerstört, aber auch dafür gesorgt, dass durch Vandalismus nicht mehr zerstört werden konnte.
Saacha Schick (2 years ago)
Gay cruising
Michael Mnich (2 years ago)
Ich glaube die Kelten sind hier schon länger weg. Sowie auch das Militär. Zum Glück muss man nicht mehr über den Zaun kletern um etwas zu sehen. Ein kleine Hügel mit Sitzgelegenheit und Infotafel macht es durchaus angenehm.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Garden Kingdom of Dessau-Wörlitz

The Garden Kingdom of Dessau-Wörlitz, located in Saxony-Anhalt in the Middle Elbe Region, is an exceptional example of landscape design and planning from the Age of the Enlightenment in the 18th century. Its diverse components – the outstanding buildings, English-style landscaped parks and gardens, and subtly modified expanses of agricultural land – served aesthetic, educational, and economic purposes in an exemplary manner.

The grounds, which had been divided into four parts since the constructions of a railway line and the Bundesautobahn 9 in the 1930s, were designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2000.

For Prince Leopold III Friedrich Franz of Anhalt-Dessau (1740-1817) and his friend and adviser Friedrich Wilhelm von Erdmannsdorff (1736-1800), the study of landscape gardens in England and ancient buildings in Italy during several tours was the impetus for their own creative programme in the little principality by the rivers Elbe and Mulde. As a result, the first landscape garden in continental Europe was created here, with Wörlitz as its focus. Over a period of forty years a network of visual and stylistic relationships was developed with other landscape gardens in the region, leading to the creation of a garden landscape on a unique scale in Europe. In the making of this landscape, the designers strove to go beyond the mere copying of garden scenery and buildings from other sites, but instead to generate a synthesis of a wide range of artistic relationships. Among new and characteristic components of this garden landscape was the integration of a didactic element, arising from the philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778), the thinking of Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717-1768), and the aesthetics of Johann Georg Sulzer (1720-1779). The notion of public access to the buildings and grounds was a reflection of the pedagogic concept of the humanisation of society.

Proceeding from the idea of the ferme ornée, agriculture as the basis for everyday life found its place in the garden landscape. In a Rousseauian sense, agriculture also had to perform a pedagogic function in Anhalt-Dessau. Through the deliberate demonstration of new farming methods in the landscape garden, developments in Anhalt-Dessau were not merely theoretical, but a practical demonstration of their models in England. It is noteworthy that these objectives - the integration of aesthetics and education into the landscape – were implemented with outstanding artistic quality. Thus, for instance, the buildings of Friedrich Wilhelm von Erdmannsdorff provided important models for the architectural development of Germany and central Europe. Schloss Wörlitz (1769-73) was the first Neoclassical building in German architectural history. The Gothic House (from 1774) was a decisive influence on the development of Gothic Revival architecture in central Europe. Here, for the first time, the Gothic style was used to carry a political message, namely the desire for the retention of sovereignty among the smaller Imperial territories. The churches in Riesigk (1800), Wörlitz (1804-09), and Vockerode (1810-11) were the first Neoclassical, ecclesiastical buildings in Germany, their towers enlivening the marshland, floodplain landscape in which they served as waymarkers. In parts of the Baroque park of Oranienbaum, an Anglo-Chinese garden was laid out, now the sole surviving example in Europe of such a garden in its original form from the period before 1800. The development of stylistic eclecticism in the 19th century had its roots in the closing years of the 18th century.

Another feature of the landscape is the integration of new technological achievements, such as the building of bridges, an expression of a continuing quest for modernity. Through the conscious incorporation of the older layouts at Oranienbaum and Mosigkau into a pantheon of styles, the landscape became an architectural encyclopaedia featuring examples from ancient times to the latest developments. Nowhere else in Germany or Europe had a prince brought such an all-embracing and extensive programme of landscape reform into being, particularly one so deeply rooted in philosophical and educational theory. With the unique density of its landscape of monuments, the Garden Kingdom of Dessau-Wörlitz is an expression of the enlightened outlook of the court at Dessau, in which the landscape became the idealised world of its day.

Through the conscious and structured incorporation of economic, technological, and functional buildings and parks into the artistically designed landscape, the Garden Kingdom of Dessau-Wörlitz became an important concourse of ideas, in that it facilitated the convergence of 18th century grandeur of design with the beginnings of 19th century industrial society. The reforming outlook of this period brought about a huge diversity of change in the garden layout, and this legacy can still be experienced today.