The Goloring is an ancient earthworks monument located near Koblenz. It was created in the Bronze Age era, which dates back to the Urnfield culture (1200–800 BC). During this time a widespread solar cult is believed to have existed in Central Europe.

The Goloring consists of a circular ditch of 175 metres in diameter with an outside embankment extending to 190 metres. Technically this makes the structure a henge monument, although the use of the term henge outside of Britain is sometimes disputed. The outside embankment is approx. 7 metres wide and 80 cm high. The ditch has an upper width of 5–6 metres and is approx. 80 cm deep. In the interior one can find a roughly circular leveled platform, which is about elevated by about 1 metre. The platform has been created based on piled gravelled rock and has a diameter of 95 metres. Remnants of a 50 cm thick wooden post with an estimated height of 8–12 metres were excavated in the middle of this platform.

The design of the ditch is unique in Germany, and makes the earthworks similar to many British monuments of the same era. It is often compared to Stonehenge in England, which has similar diametric proportions.

Goloring is located within the boundaries of a former military dog training camp, but was acquired by the town of Kobern-Gondorf in June 2004. The Goloring is currently not accessible to the general public but there are plans under way to build a historic park with the earthworks at its centre.

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Address

L52, Koblenz, Germany
See all sites in Koblenz

Details

Founded: 1200-800 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Bronze Age (Germany)

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Dötsch (11 months ago)
Sehr schöner Parkplatz. Liegt direkt am Wald. Leider ist der Zugang zum Wald versperrt. Der Parkplatz ist sauber.
Lisa Meier (12 months ago)
Von außen kann man nicht viel sehen (Zaun, teilweise mit Stacheldraht). Die Anlage ist nur im Rahmen einer Führung zu besichtigen. Die Führung war sehr langwierig und trocken vorgetragen, teilweise wurde uns alles doppelt erzählt. Bei dem kurzen Rundgang ca. 600 Meter, ging es erst durch ein kleines Waldstück und dann durchs Gebüsch (zu dem Zeitpunkt als wir da waren, war das Unkraut und Gras sehr hoch), so das man nicht gut laufen konnte. Für uns hat sich die Besichtigung nicht gelohnt.
Clemens Wilhelm (13 months ago)
Leider ist die Anlage nur mit Führung zu besichtigen. Die lohnt sich aber alle Mal. Mit einer interessanten Einführung in die Geschichte der Anlage und den Schwierigkeiten, mit denen die Archäologen zu kämpfen hatten, eine rundum gelungene Veranstaltung. Darüber, wie der zweite Weltkrieg und der Bau der A48 auf der einen Seite vieles zerstört haben, auf der anderen Seite aber dadurch alles genau dokumentiert werden konnte, und die Zerstörung durch den Kies-Abbau, wurde auch informiert. Auch die Bundeswehr, die den Standort nutzte, hat zwar einiges zerstört, aber auch dafür gesorgt, dass durch Vandalismus nicht mehr zerstört werden konnte.
Saacha Schick (16 months ago)
Gay cruising
Michael Mnich (17 months ago)
Ich glaube die Kelten sind hier schon länger weg. Sowie auch das Militär. Zum Glück muss man nicht mehr über den Zaun kletern um etwas zu sehen. Ein kleine Hügel mit Sitzgelegenheit und Infotafel macht es durchaus angenehm.
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