Sant Anastasia Church

Verona, Italy

Sant'Anastasia church building started in 1280 and completed in 1400, designed by the Dominican friars. It took its name from a pre-existing temple built by King Theoderic the Great upon which was built the actual church. Since 1307, it is in fact co-entitled to St. Peter of Verona, martyr and co-patron of the city. Consecrated only in 1471, until 1808 the church was held by the Dominicans.

The 72 mt tall belltower had four bells in 1460, the fifth was added in 1650. In the 1839 were casted the actual 9 bells tuned in C, them are ringed in Veronese bellringing art by a local team founded in 1776. The façade is divided into three vertical section corresponding to the nave and the two aisles in the interior. Unfinished, the façade is mostly in brickwork. In the centre of the middle section is a simply rose window.

The 15th century portal has two doors, and is enclosed into a Gothic structure (1330) with arches supported by ornamental columns in red, black and white marble. The arches forms three lunettes: in the larger one is a representation of the Holy Trinity with two Angels, flanked by St. Joseph and the Holy Virgin. The Father sits on a Gothic throne with Crucifix on his knees and Christ on his side, surmounted by a dove. In the two smaller lunettes, directly over the portal, are portrayed the Bishop leading the Veronese people and St. Peter of Verona leading the monks, with the white-black banner of the Dominicans. The five splays of the Gothic arch are decorated with six chronological scenes of Jesus' life: the Annunciation, the Birth, the Adoration of the Magi, the Path towards the Calvary, the Crucifixion and the Resurrection. The central column between the doors has high-reliefs with St. Dominic, St. Peter of Verona and St. Thomas.

The interior, on the Latin cross plan, is divided into a nave and two aisles, with crossed vaults, separated by six columns each; the latter are in white or red Verona marble, with Gothic capitals. The four columns over the high altar show the coat of arms of the Castelbarco of Trento, a family who extensively contributed to the church's construction. Notable is the funerary monument to Cortesia Serego, on the left of the apse, which was finished in 1432 by Vincenzo di Stefano da Verona. It portrays the riding figure of Cortesia, clad with an armor and holding a commanding wand. The horse is placed of the sculpted sarcophagus, which has always been empty. The fresco part represents the Annunciation and the Saints Peter of Verona and Dominic.

The two stoups before the first two columns stands on two hunchback figures, one of which attributed to Paolo Veronese's elder son, Gabriele Caliari.

The Pellegrini Chapel houses the late International Gothic fresco of St. George and the Princess, main work of Pisanello, as well as terra-cotta statues by Michele di Firenze, executed before 1436. A frieze by the latter, or by Pisanello, has now disappeared. The Pellegrini chapel also houses the grave of Wilhelm von Bibra.

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Address

Via Don Bassi 12, Verona, Italy
See all sites in Verona

Details

Founded: 1280
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elena Varasi (2 years ago)
One the finest examples of Italian Gothic. A true masterpiece.
Jakub Kubajek (3 years ago)
It is a very beautiful place. Audioguides are very interesting. It is certainly worth visiting.
Paul Barton (3 years ago)
This church is full of historical art and statues. The three coloured marble floor is remarkable and the place is full of vibrant colours. The audio tours are very good and most languages are catered for.
Eudoxio Junior (3 years ago)
A wonderful church! This church is, like others in Italy, very beautiful and fascinating. The details are impeccable, with beautiful sculptures, paintings and pictures. There is a kind of museum inside there that you have to pay if you want to visit it. The entrance in the church is free. This church is too close of the Adige river.
Gary Smith (3 years ago)
Nice church, worth a visit, audio guide in English informative after a fashion. Worth the money if you buy the four church pass and visit all four. You have to admire the work people put into their places of worship irrespective of your beliefs.
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