Càrn Liath is an Iron Age broch on the eastern shore of the Scottish Highlands. The broch has an external diameter of around 19 metres and an internal diameter of around 10 metres. The entrance passage is on the east side and is over 4 metres long. The entrance has elaborate door checks and a bar-hole to control access to the interior. On the right-hand side of the entrance passage is a small guard cell. The surrounding enclosure contains the ruins of additional stone buildings.

The broch was first excavated in the 19th century by the Duke of Sutherland, and was initially thought to be a burial cairn. Finds included pottery, flint chips, stone hammers, mortars and pestles, querns, whorls, shale rings, long-handled bone combs, a whale bone club, a silver fibula, steatite cups and an iron blade.

The site was excavated again in 1986. This showed that the site was occupied in the Bronze Age, before the broch was built. A Bronze Age cist burial with a food vessel was discovered. The foundations of many outbuildings were found in the enclosure surrounding the broch. Although many were clearly from a later period, some may have been contemporary with the broch.

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Address

A9, Highland, United Kingdom
See all sites in Highland

Details

Founded: 300 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Keith Bowman (3 months ago)
Really interesting example of a broch in a stunning coastal setting. Be aware that the parking is on the opposite side of the busy A9 road and the footpaths that take you 100 yards or so to a safe crossing place where not well sign posted when we visited (July 2021).
George N (3 months ago)
Interesting historical Pictish Tower. Free entry, but the busy A9 to cross from the car park.
Becky Dey (4 months ago)
Free. Very informative notice boards. Just watch crossing the road with children from the free car park
Ruth Woolley (5 months ago)
I thoroughly enjoyed visiting here and it was absolutely torrential rain. Safe crossing from the parking and a great spot to visit. You don't need long here to appreciate its beauty.
Hector Walker (7 months ago)
A place from the passed thats worth a visit. Beware of the midges in the summer months. Haha.
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